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Volatile metabolites in the exhaled breath of healthy volunteers: their levels and distributions.
J Breath Res. 2007 Sep; 1(1):014004.JB

Abstract

The data obtained for the concentration distributions of the most abundant volatile metabolites in exhaled breath determined in two independent studies are reviewed, the first limited study involving five healthy volunteers providing daily breath samples over a month, and the subsequent study involving 30 healthy volunteers providing breath samples weekly over six months. Both studies were carried out using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, to obtain on-line, real-time analyses of single breath exhalations, avoiding the complications associated with sample collection. The distributions of the metabolites from the larger more comprehensive study are mostly seen to be log normal with the median values (in parts per billion, ppb) being ammonia (833), acetone (477), methanol (461), ethanol (112), propanol (18), acetaldehyde (22), isoprene (106) with the geometric standard deviation being typically 1.6, except for ethanol which was larger (3.24) due to the obvious increase of breath ethanol following the ingestion of sugar. These were the first well-defined concentration distributions of breath metabolites obtained and they are the essential requirement for recognizing abnormally high levels that are associated with particular diseases. The associations of each metabolite with known diseased states are alluded to. These SIFT-MS studies reveal the promise of breath analysis as a valuable addition to the tools for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, School of Medicine, Keele University, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21383430

Citation

Smith, David, et al. "Volatile Metabolites in the Exhaled Breath of Healthy Volunteers: Their Levels and Distributions." Journal of Breath Research, vol. 1, no. 1, 2007, p. 014004.
Smith D, Turner C, Spaněl P. Volatile metabolites in the exhaled breath of healthy volunteers: their levels and distributions. J Breath Res. 2007;1(1):014004.
Smith, D., Turner, C., & Spaněl, P. (2007). Volatile metabolites in the exhaled breath of healthy volunteers: their levels and distributions. Journal of Breath Research, 1(1), 014004. https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/1/1/014004
Smith D, Turner C, Spaněl P. Volatile Metabolites in the Exhaled Breath of Healthy Volunteers: Their Levels and Distributions. J Breath Res. 2007;1(1):014004. PubMed PMID: 21383430.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Volatile metabolites in the exhaled breath of healthy volunteers: their levels and distributions. AU - Smith,David, AU - Turner,Claire, AU - Spaněl,Patrik, Y1 - 2007/09/04/ PY - 2011/3/9/entrez PY - 2007/9/1/pubmed PY - 2007/9/1/medline SP - 014004 EP - 014004 JF - Journal of breath research JO - J Breath Res VL - 1 IS - 1 N2 - The data obtained for the concentration distributions of the most abundant volatile metabolites in exhaled breath determined in two independent studies are reviewed, the first limited study involving five healthy volunteers providing daily breath samples over a month, and the subsequent study involving 30 healthy volunteers providing breath samples weekly over six months. Both studies were carried out using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, to obtain on-line, real-time analyses of single breath exhalations, avoiding the complications associated with sample collection. The distributions of the metabolites from the larger more comprehensive study are mostly seen to be log normal with the median values (in parts per billion, ppb) being ammonia (833), acetone (477), methanol (461), ethanol (112), propanol (18), acetaldehyde (22), isoprene (106) with the geometric standard deviation being typically 1.6, except for ethanol which was larger (3.24) due to the obvious increase of breath ethanol following the ingestion of sugar. These were the first well-defined concentration distributions of breath metabolites obtained and they are the essential requirement for recognizing abnormally high levels that are associated with particular diseases. The associations of each metabolite with known diseased states are alluded to. These SIFT-MS studies reveal the promise of breath analysis as a valuable addition to the tools for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. SN - 1752-7155 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21383430/Volatile_metabolites_in_the_exhaled_breath_of_healthy_volunteers:_their_levels_and_distributions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/1/1/014004 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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