Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bone is more susceptible to vitamin K deficiency than liver in the institutionalized elderly.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2011; 20(1):50-5.AP

Abstract

In Japan, γ-carboxylation of blood coagulation factors is the basis for determining adequate intake (AI) for vitamin K in Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) issued in 2010. Recently, vitamin K is also known to be essential for preventing fracture. In this study, relative susceptibility of liver and bone to vitamin K deficiency was studied. Thirty-seven elderly institutionalized subjects were evaluated for vitamin K status by measuring serum PIVKA (protein induced by vitamin K absence) -II and ucOC (undercarboxylated osteocalcin) levels, as sensitive markers for hepatic and skeletal vitamin K deficiency, respectively. Serum PIVKA-II and ucOC levels, with their cut-off values in the parentheses, were 20.2±8.9 mAUmL (28 mAU/mL) and 4.7±3.0 ng/mL (4.5 ng/mL), respectively. Median vitamin K intake was approximately 200 μg/day, which is more than 3 times higher than the current Japanese AI. Vitamin K intake was significantly correlated with serum PIVKA-II and ucOC/OC levels, but not with serum ucOC level. Although serum ucOC level is generally a good indicator for vitamin K status, multiple regression analysis revealed that elevated bone turnover marker significantly contributed to serum ucOC level. All subjects had vitamin K intake exceeding AI for vitamin K. Nevertheless, serum PIVKA-II and ucOC concentrations exceeded the cut-off value in 14% and 43% of subjects, respectively. The present findings suggest that vitamin K intake greater than the current AI is required for the skeletal health in the institutionalized elderly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyoto Women's University, 35, Imakumano-kitahiyoshicho, Higashiyama 605-8501 Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21393110

Citation

Kuwabara, Akiko, et al. "Bone Is More Susceptible to Vitamin K Deficiency Than Liver in the Institutionalized Elderly." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 20, no. 1, 2011, pp. 50-5.
Kuwabara A, Fujii M, Kawai N, et al. Bone is more susceptible to vitamin K deficiency than liver in the institutionalized elderly. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2011;20(1):50-5.
Kuwabara, A., Fujii, M., Kawai, N., Tozawa, K., Kido, S., & Tanaka, K. (2011). Bone is more susceptible to vitamin K deficiency than liver in the institutionalized elderly. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 20(1), 50-5.
Kuwabara A, et al. Bone Is More Susceptible to Vitamin K Deficiency Than Liver in the Institutionalized Elderly. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2011;20(1):50-5. PubMed PMID: 21393110.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bone is more susceptible to vitamin K deficiency than liver in the institutionalized elderly. AU - Kuwabara,Akiko, AU - Fujii,Minori, AU - Kawai,Nobuko, AU - Tozawa,Kunihiko, AU - Kido,Shoko, AU - Tanaka,Kiyoshi, PY - 2011/3/12/entrez PY - 2011/3/12/pubmed PY - 2011/5/6/medline SP - 50 EP - 5 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - In Japan, γ-carboxylation of blood coagulation factors is the basis for determining adequate intake (AI) for vitamin K in Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) issued in 2010. Recently, vitamin K is also known to be essential for preventing fracture. In this study, relative susceptibility of liver and bone to vitamin K deficiency was studied. Thirty-seven elderly institutionalized subjects were evaluated for vitamin K status by measuring serum PIVKA (protein induced by vitamin K absence) -II and ucOC (undercarboxylated osteocalcin) levels, as sensitive markers for hepatic and skeletal vitamin K deficiency, respectively. Serum PIVKA-II and ucOC levels, with their cut-off values in the parentheses, were 20.2±8.9 mAUmL (28 mAU/mL) and 4.7±3.0 ng/mL (4.5 ng/mL), respectively. Median vitamin K intake was approximately 200 μg/day, which is more than 3 times higher than the current Japanese AI. Vitamin K intake was significantly correlated with serum PIVKA-II and ucOC/OC levels, but not with serum ucOC level. Although serum ucOC level is generally a good indicator for vitamin K status, multiple regression analysis revealed that elevated bone turnover marker significantly contributed to serum ucOC level. All subjects had vitamin K intake exceeding AI for vitamin K. Nevertheless, serum PIVKA-II and ucOC concentrations exceeded the cut-off value in 14% and 43% of subjects, respectively. The present findings suggest that vitamin K intake greater than the current AI is required for the skeletal health in the institutionalized elderly. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21393110/Bone_is_more_susceptible_to_vitamin_K_deficiency_than_liver_in_the_institutionalized_elderly_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/20/1/50.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -