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Double stellate tongue reduction: a new method of treatment for macroglossia in patients with Beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.
Ann Plast Surg. 2011 Sep; 67(3):240-4.AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although multiple methods of tongue reduction have been described, recent literature suggests that the central reductions may be more favorable in patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). In this case series, we review our experience with macroglossia associated with BWS, and we offer a new technique of central tongue reduction.

METHODS

Between 1993 and 2007, a retrospective chart review was conducted to include all patients with a diagnosis of BWS who have undergone stellate or double stellate tongue reduction at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin.

RESULTS

A total of 7 patients met all inclusion criteria. All patients had good tongue mobility at 1-year follow-up. One patient required speech therapy for persistent articulation errors postoperatively. A total of 2 patients required secondary procedures for recurrent macroglossia. There were no complaints of abnormal taste or sensation.

CONCLUSIONS

The stellate and double stellate tongue reductions provide effective treatment in macroglossia associated with BWS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plastic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. phetting@mcw.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21407066

Citation

Hettinger, Patrick C., and Arlen D. Denny. "Double Stellate Tongue Reduction: a New Method of Treatment for Macroglossia in Patients With Beckwith-wiedemann Syndrome." Annals of Plastic Surgery, vol. 67, no. 3, 2011, pp. 240-4.
Hettinger PC, Denny AD. Double stellate tongue reduction: a new method of treatment for macroglossia in patients with Beckwith-wiedemann syndrome. Ann Plast Surg. 2011;67(3):240-4.
Hettinger, P. C., & Denny, A. D. (2011). Double stellate tongue reduction: a new method of treatment for macroglossia in patients with Beckwith-wiedemann syndrome. Annals of Plastic Surgery, 67(3), 240-4. https://doi.org/10.1097/SAP.0b013e3181f77a83
Hettinger PC, Denny AD. Double Stellate Tongue Reduction: a New Method of Treatment for Macroglossia in Patients With Beckwith-wiedemann Syndrome. Ann Plast Surg. 2011;67(3):240-4. PubMed PMID: 21407066.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Double stellate tongue reduction: a new method of treatment for macroglossia in patients with Beckwith-wiedemann syndrome. AU - Hettinger,Patrick C, AU - Denny,Arlen D, PY - 2011/3/17/entrez PY - 2011/3/17/pubmed PY - 2012/3/14/medline SP - 240 EP - 4 JF - Annals of plastic surgery JO - Ann Plast Surg VL - 67 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although multiple methods of tongue reduction have been described, recent literature suggests that the central reductions may be more favorable in patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). In this case series, we review our experience with macroglossia associated with BWS, and we offer a new technique of central tongue reduction. METHODS: Between 1993 and 2007, a retrospective chart review was conducted to include all patients with a diagnosis of BWS who have undergone stellate or double stellate tongue reduction at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. RESULTS: A total of 7 patients met all inclusion criteria. All patients had good tongue mobility at 1-year follow-up. One patient required speech therapy for persistent articulation errors postoperatively. A total of 2 patients required secondary procedures for recurrent macroglossia. There were no complaints of abnormal taste or sensation. CONCLUSIONS: The stellate and double stellate tongue reductions provide effective treatment in macroglossia associated with BWS. SN - 1536-3708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21407066/Double_stellate_tongue_reduction:_a_new_method_of_treatment_for_macroglossia_in_patients_with_Beckwith_wiedemann_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/SAP.0b013e3181f77a83 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -