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Modulation of auditory and visual processing by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol: an FMRI study.

Abstract

Although the effects of cannabis on perception are well documented, little is known about their neural basis or how these may contribute to the formation of psychotic symptoms. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) during visual and auditory processing in healthy volunteers. In total, 14 healthy volunteers were scanned on three occasions. Identical 10 mg THC, 600 mg CBD, and placebo capsules were allocated in a balanced double-blinded pseudo-randomized crossover design. Plasma levels of each substance, physiological parameters, and measures of psychopathology were taken at baseline and at regular intervals following ingestion of substances. Volunteers listened passively to words read and viewed a radial visual checkerboard in alternating blocks during fMRI scanning. Administration of THC was associated with increases in anxiety, intoxication, and positive psychotic symptoms, whereas CBD had no significant symptomatic effects. THC decreased activation relative to placebo in bilateral temporal cortices during auditory processing, and increased and decreased activation in different visual areas during visual processing. CBD was associated with activation in right temporal cortex during auditory processing, and when contrasted, THC and CBD had opposite effects in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus, the right-sided homolog to Wernicke's area. Moreover, the attenuation of activation in this area (maximum 61, -15, -2) by THC during auditory processing was correlated with its acute effect on psychotic symptoms. Single doses of THC and CBD differently modulate brain function in areas that process auditory and visual stimuli and relate to induced psychotic symptoms.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's Health Partners, London, UK. toby.winton-brown@kcl.ac.uk

    , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Acoustic Stimulation
    Adult
    Afferent Pathways
    Brain
    Brain Mapping
    Cannabidiol
    Double-Blind Method
    Dronabinol
    Humans
    Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Male
    Oxygen
    Photic Stimulation
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21412224

    Citation

    Winton-Brown, Toby T., et al. "Modulation of Auditory and Visual Processing By Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol: an FMRI Study." Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 36, no. 7, 2011, pp. 1340-8.
    Winton-Brown TT, Allen P, Bhattacharyya S, et al. Modulation of auditory and visual processing by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol: an FMRI study. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2011;36(7):1340-8.
    Winton-Brown, T. T., Allen, P., Bhattacharyya, S., Bhattacharrya, S., Borgwardt, S. J., Fusar-Poli, P., ... McGuire, P. K. (2011). Modulation of auditory and visual processing by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol: an FMRI study. Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 36(7), pp. 1340-8. doi:10.1038/npp.2011.17.
    Winton-Brown TT, et al. Modulation of Auditory and Visual Processing By Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol: an FMRI Study. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2011;36(7):1340-8. PubMed PMID: 21412224.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Modulation of auditory and visual processing by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol: an FMRI study. AU - Winton-Brown,Toby T, AU - Allen,Paul, AU - Bhattacharyya,Sagnik, AU - Bhattacharrya,Sagnik, AU - Borgwardt,Stefan J, AU - Fusar-Poli,Paolo, AU - Crippa,Jose A, AU - Seal,Marc L, AU - Martin-Santos,Rocio, AU - Ffytche,Dominic, AU - Zuardi,Antonio W, AU - Atakan,Zerrin, AU - McGuire,Philip K, Y1 - 2011/03/16/ PY - 2011/3/18/entrez PY - 2011/3/18/pubmed PY - 2011/8/11/medline SP - 1340 EP - 8 JF - Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology JO - Neuropsychopharmacology VL - 36 IS - 7 N2 - Although the effects of cannabis on perception are well documented, little is known about their neural basis or how these may contribute to the formation of psychotic symptoms. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) during visual and auditory processing in healthy volunteers. In total, 14 healthy volunteers were scanned on three occasions. Identical 10 mg THC, 600 mg CBD, and placebo capsules were allocated in a balanced double-blinded pseudo-randomized crossover design. Plasma levels of each substance, physiological parameters, and measures of psychopathology were taken at baseline and at regular intervals following ingestion of substances. Volunteers listened passively to words read and viewed a radial visual checkerboard in alternating blocks during fMRI scanning. Administration of THC was associated with increases in anxiety, intoxication, and positive psychotic symptoms, whereas CBD had no significant symptomatic effects. THC decreased activation relative to placebo in bilateral temporal cortices during auditory processing, and increased and decreased activation in different visual areas during visual processing. CBD was associated with activation in right temporal cortex during auditory processing, and when contrasted, THC and CBD had opposite effects in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus, the right-sided homolog to Wernicke's area. Moreover, the attenuation of activation in this area (maximum 61, -15, -2) by THC during auditory processing was correlated with its acute effect on psychotic symptoms. Single doses of THC and CBD differently modulate brain function in areas that process auditory and visual stimuli and relate to induced psychotic symptoms. SN - 1740-634X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21412224/Modulation_of_auditory_and_visual_processing_by_delta_9_tetrahydrocannabinol_and_cannabidiol:_an_FMRI_study_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2011.17 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -