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Adult weight change and incidence of premenopausal breast cancer.
Int J Cancer 2012; 130(4):902-9IJ

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are inversely related to the risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women. We assessed the association between adult weight change since age 18 years with the risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women to explore whether weight gain was associated with a decrease in risk and weight loss was associated with an increase in risk. A total of 56,223 premenopausal participants in the Nurses' Health Study and 109,385 premenopausal participants in the Nurses' Health Study II were prospectively followed for up to 32 years and 18 years, respectively, and weight change since age 18 years was assessed biennially. The incidence of invasive breast cancer was assessed throughout follow-up. Weight loss of 5 kg or more since age 18, maintained for at least 4 years, was related to lower incidence of premenopausal breast cancer, compared to maintaining a stable weight, but this relation was of borderline statistical significance (covariate-adjusted HR = 0.75; 95% CI 0.52-1.09). Weight gain since age 18 years was also inversely related to breast cancer incidence among premenopausal women (covariate-adjusted p for trend = 0.01), but the association weakened after controlling for weight at age 18 and did not reach statistical significance (p for trend = 0.08). Although obesity and breast cancer among premenopausal women are inversely related, weight loss since age 18 years did not increase and weight gain did not significantly decrease the risk of premenopausal breast cancer among participants in the large prospective cohorts of NHS and NHS II.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. kmichels@rics.bwh.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21413008

Citation

Michels, Karin B., et al. "Adult Weight Change and Incidence of Premenopausal Breast Cancer." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 130, no. 4, 2012, pp. 902-9.
Michels KB, Terry KL, Eliassen AH, et al. Adult weight change and incidence of premenopausal breast cancer. Int J Cancer. 2012;130(4):902-9.
Michels, K. B., Terry, K. L., Eliassen, A. H., Hankinson, S. E., & Willett, W. C. (2012). Adult weight change and incidence of premenopausal breast cancer. International Journal of Cancer, 130(4), pp. 902-9. doi:10.1002/ijc.26069.
Michels KB, et al. Adult Weight Change and Incidence of Premenopausal Breast Cancer. Int J Cancer. 2012 Feb 15;130(4):902-9. PubMed PMID: 21413008.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adult weight change and incidence of premenopausal breast cancer. AU - Michels,Karin B, AU - Terry,Kathryn L, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Willett,Walter C, Y1 - 2011/05/09/ PY - 2010/12/10/received PY - 2011/03/07/accepted PY - 2011/3/18/entrez PY - 2011/3/18/pubmed PY - 2012/3/1/medline SP - 902 EP - 9 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 130 IS - 4 N2 - Overweight and obesity are inversely related to the risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women. We assessed the association between adult weight change since age 18 years with the risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women to explore whether weight gain was associated with a decrease in risk and weight loss was associated with an increase in risk. A total of 56,223 premenopausal participants in the Nurses' Health Study and 109,385 premenopausal participants in the Nurses' Health Study II were prospectively followed for up to 32 years and 18 years, respectively, and weight change since age 18 years was assessed biennially. The incidence of invasive breast cancer was assessed throughout follow-up. Weight loss of 5 kg or more since age 18, maintained for at least 4 years, was related to lower incidence of premenopausal breast cancer, compared to maintaining a stable weight, but this relation was of borderline statistical significance (covariate-adjusted HR = 0.75; 95% CI 0.52-1.09). Weight gain since age 18 years was also inversely related to breast cancer incidence among premenopausal women (covariate-adjusted p for trend = 0.01), but the association weakened after controlling for weight at age 18 and did not reach statistical significance (p for trend = 0.08). Although obesity and breast cancer among premenopausal women are inversely related, weight loss since age 18 years did not increase and weight gain did not significantly decrease the risk of premenopausal breast cancer among participants in the large prospective cohorts of NHS and NHS II. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21413008/Adult_weight_change_and_incidence_of_premenopausal_breast_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.26069 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -