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Breastfeeding practices of Cameroonian mothers determined by dietary recall since birth and the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique.

Abstract

Exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of infant's life is a public health recommendation and important factor for the promotion of optimal growth, health and behavioural development of each child. The accuracy of the mothers' self-reported past infant-feeding events was examined and compared with the isotopic dilution technique. Breastfeeding practices were assessed in a sample of 44 Cameroonian mother-infant pairs using dietary recall since birth. Intakes of breast milk and non-breast milk water were measured in the same sample using the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique and compared with questionnaire. Results showed that mothers' self-reported behaviour overestimates the exclusive breastfeeding rate. Seventy-five per cent of the mothers who claimed to be exclusively breastfeeding were found to be predominantly or partially breastfeeding by the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique. Only 11% of the infants were exclusively breastfed, and the breast milk output was not significantly affected (P ≤ 0.05) by the mother's body composition. Mean intakes of breast milk and non-breast milk water were 701 mL day(-1) and 268 mL day(-1), respectively. Introduction of non-breast milk foods is associated with a reduction in the level of breast milk intake, but the difference in breast milk intake was not significant between exclusively and predominantly breastfed infants. In conclusion, the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique can be applied to validate the mother's reports of infant-feeding practices, but non-breast milk water intake by breastfeeding category still needs to be normalized.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centre for Food and Nutrition Research, IMPM, Yaoundé, Cameroon. gmedoua@yahoo.fr

    , , , , ,

    Source

    Maternal & child nutrition 8:3 2012 Jul pg 330-9

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Composition
    Breast Feeding
    Cameroon
    Deuterium
    Deuterium Oxide
    Female
    Humans
    Indicator Dilution Techniques
    Infant
    Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Male
    Mental Recall
    Milk, Human
    Mothers
    Self Disclosure
    Social Desirability
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21426489

    Citation

    Medoua, Gabriel Nama, et al. "Breastfeeding Practices of Cameroonian Mothers Determined By Dietary Recall Since Birth and the Dose-to-the-mother Deuterium-oxide Turnover Technique." Maternal & Child Nutrition, vol. 8, no. 3, 2012, pp. 330-9.
    Medoua GN, Sajo Nana EC, Ndzana AC, et al. Breastfeeding practices of Cameroonian mothers determined by dietary recall since birth and the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique. Matern Child Nutr. 2012;8(3):330-9.
    Medoua, G. N., Sajo Nana, E. C., Ndzana, A. C., Makamto, C. S., Etame, L. S., Rikong, H. A., & Oyono, J. L. (2012). Breastfeeding practices of Cameroonian mothers determined by dietary recall since birth and the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 8(3), pp. 330-9. doi:10.1111/j.1740-8709.2011.00293.x.
    Medoua GN, et al. Breastfeeding Practices of Cameroonian Mothers Determined By Dietary Recall Since Birth and the Dose-to-the-mother Deuterium-oxide Turnover Technique. Matern Child Nutr. 2012;8(3):330-9. PubMed PMID: 21426489.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Breastfeeding practices of Cameroonian mothers determined by dietary recall since birth and the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique. AU - Medoua,Gabriel Nama, AU - Sajo Nana,Estelle C, AU - Ndzana,Anne Christine A, AU - Makamto,Caroline S, AU - Etame,Lucien S, AU - Rikong,Honorine A, AU - Oyono,Jean Louis E, Y1 - 2011/03/22/ PY - 2011/3/24/entrez PY - 2011/3/24/pubmed PY - 2012/8/7/medline SP - 330 EP - 9 JF - Maternal & child nutrition JO - Matern Child Nutr VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - Exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of infant's life is a public health recommendation and important factor for the promotion of optimal growth, health and behavioural development of each child. The accuracy of the mothers' self-reported past infant-feeding events was examined and compared with the isotopic dilution technique. Breastfeeding practices were assessed in a sample of 44 Cameroonian mother-infant pairs using dietary recall since birth. Intakes of breast milk and non-breast milk water were measured in the same sample using the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique and compared with questionnaire. Results showed that mothers' self-reported behaviour overestimates the exclusive breastfeeding rate. Seventy-five per cent of the mothers who claimed to be exclusively breastfeeding were found to be predominantly or partially breastfeeding by the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique. Only 11% of the infants were exclusively breastfed, and the breast milk output was not significantly affected (P ≤ 0.05) by the mother's body composition. Mean intakes of breast milk and non-breast milk water were 701 mL day(-1) and 268 mL day(-1), respectively. Introduction of non-breast milk foods is associated with a reduction in the level of breast milk intake, but the difference in breast milk intake was not significant between exclusively and predominantly breastfed infants. In conclusion, the dose-to-the-mother deuterium-oxide turnover technique can be applied to validate the mother's reports of infant-feeding practices, but non-breast milk water intake by breastfeeding category still needs to be normalized. SN - 1740-8709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21426489/Breastfeeding_practices_of_Cameroonian_mothers_determined_by_dietary_recall_since_birth_and_the_dose_to_the_mother_deuterium_oxide_turnover_technique_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-8709.2011.00293.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -