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Olanzapine versus placebo for out-patients with anorexia nervosa.
Psychol Med 2011; 41(10):2177-82PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant morbidity and mortality. There is little empirical support for specific treatments and new approaches are sorely needed. This two-site study aimed to determine whether olanzapine is superior to placebo in increasing body mass index (BMI) and improving psychological symptoms in out-patients with AN.

METHOD

A total of 23 individuals with AN were randomly assigned in double-blind fashion to receive olanzapine or placebo for 8 weeks together with medication management sessions that emphasized compliance. Weight, other physical assessments and measures of psychopathology were collected.

RESULTS

End-of-treatment BMI, with initial BMI as a covariate, was significantly greater in the group receiving olanzapine [F(1, 20)=6.64, p=0.018]. Psychological symptoms improved in both groups, but there were no statistically significant group differences. Of the 23 participants, 17 (74%) completed the 8-week trial. Participants tolerated the medication well with sedation being the only frequent side effect and no adverse metabolic effects were noted.

CONCLUSIONS

This small study suggests that olanzapine is generally well tolerated by, and may provide more benefit than placebo for out-patients with AN. Further study is indicated to determine whether olanzapine may affect psychological symptoms in addition to BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. ea12@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21426603

Citation

Attia, E, et al. "Olanzapine Versus Placebo for Out-patients With Anorexia Nervosa." Psychological Medicine, vol. 41, no. 10, 2011, pp. 2177-82.
Attia E, Kaplan AS, Walsh BT, et al. Olanzapine versus placebo for out-patients with anorexia nervosa. Psychol Med. 2011;41(10):2177-82.
Attia, E., Kaplan, A. S., Walsh, B. T., Gershkovich, M., Yilmaz, Z., Musante, D., & Wang, Y. (2011). Olanzapine versus placebo for out-patients with anorexia nervosa. Psychological Medicine, 41(10), pp. 2177-82. doi:10.1017/S0033291711000390.
Attia E, et al. Olanzapine Versus Placebo for Out-patients With Anorexia Nervosa. Psychol Med. 2011;41(10):2177-82. PubMed PMID: 21426603.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Olanzapine versus placebo for out-patients with anorexia nervosa. AU - Attia,E, AU - Kaplan,A S, AU - Walsh,B T, AU - Gershkovich,M, AU - Yilmaz,Z, AU - Musante,D, AU - Wang,Y, Y1 - 2011/03/22/ PY - 2011/3/24/entrez PY - 2011/3/24/pubmed PY - 2012/2/18/medline SP - 2177 EP - 82 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 41 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant morbidity and mortality. There is little empirical support for specific treatments and new approaches are sorely needed. This two-site study aimed to determine whether olanzapine is superior to placebo in increasing body mass index (BMI) and improving psychological symptoms in out-patients with AN. METHOD: A total of 23 individuals with AN were randomly assigned in double-blind fashion to receive olanzapine or placebo for 8 weeks together with medication management sessions that emphasized compliance. Weight, other physical assessments and measures of psychopathology were collected. RESULTS: End-of-treatment BMI, with initial BMI as a covariate, was significantly greater in the group receiving olanzapine [F(1, 20)=6.64, p=0.018]. Psychological symptoms improved in both groups, but there were no statistically significant group differences. Of the 23 participants, 17 (74%) completed the 8-week trial. Participants tolerated the medication well with sedation being the only frequent side effect and no adverse metabolic effects were noted. CONCLUSIONS: This small study suggests that olanzapine is generally well tolerated by, and may provide more benefit than placebo for out-patients with AN. Further study is indicated to determine whether olanzapine may affect psychological symptoms in addition to BMI. SN - 1469-8978 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21426603/full_citation L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0033291711000390/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -