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Self-reported and measured anthropometric data and risk of colorectal cancer in the EPIC-Norfolk study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiological studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between body size and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Inconsistencies may be because of the reliance on self-reported measures of body size.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the association of self-reported and directly assessed anthropometric data (body height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist, hip, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and chest circumference) with CRC risk in the EPIC-Norfolk study.

DESIGN

A total of 20,608 participants with complete self-reported and measured height and weight and without any history of cancer were followed up an average of 11 years, during which 357 incident CRC cases were recorded. Hazard Ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS

After adjustment for confounders, HRs among women in the highest quintile of the body size measure relative to the lowest quintile showed that measured height (HR=1.98, 95% CI=1.19-3.28, P (trend)=0.009), measured waist circumference (HR=1.65, 95% CI=0.97-2.86, P (trend)=0.009) and measured WHR (HR=2.07, 95% CI=1.17-3.67, P (trend)=0.001) were associated with increased CRC risk. Associations using corresponding self-reported measures were attenuated and not statistically significant. Conversely, the association of BMI with CRC risk in women was weaker using measured BMI (HR=1.57, 95% CI=0.91-2.73, P (trend)=0.05) compared with self-reported BMI (HR=1.97, 95% CI=1.18-3.30, P (trend)=0.02). In men no significantly increased CRC risk was observed with any of the anthropometric measures.

CONCLUSIONS

Measured height, waist circumference and WHR were associated with CRC risk in women, whereas any significant associations with those measures were attenuated when self-reported data were used.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. ParkJY@fellows.iarc.fr

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Body Fat Distribution
    Body Height
    Body Mass Index
    Body Weight
    Cohort Studies
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Female
    Humans
    Life Style
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Self Report
    Sex Distribution
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United Kingdom
    Waist-Hip Ratio

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21427695

    Citation

    Park, J Y., et al. "Self-reported and Measured Anthropometric Data and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the EPIC-Norfolk Study." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 36, no. 1, 2012, pp. 107-18.
    Park JY, Mitrou PN, Keogh RH, et al. Self-reported and measured anthropometric data and risk of colorectal cancer in the EPIC-Norfolk study. Int J Obes (Lond). 2012;36(1):107-18.
    Park, J. Y., Mitrou, P. N., Keogh, R. H., Luben, R. N., Wareham, N. J., & Khaw, K. T. (2012). Self-reported and measured anthropometric data and risk of colorectal cancer in the EPIC-Norfolk study. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 36(1), pp. 107-18. doi:10.1038/ijo.2011.61.
    Park JY, et al. Self-reported and Measured Anthropometric Data and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the EPIC-Norfolk Study. Int J Obes (Lond). 2012;36(1):107-18. PubMed PMID: 21427695.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported and measured anthropometric data and risk of colorectal cancer in the EPIC-Norfolk study. AU - Park,J Y, AU - Mitrou,P N, AU - Keogh,R H, AU - Luben,R N, AU - Wareham,N J, AU - Khaw,K-T, Y1 - 2011/03/22/ PY - 2011/3/24/entrez PY - 2011/3/24/pubmed PY - 2012/3/2/medline SP - 107 EP - 18 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between body size and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Inconsistencies may be because of the reliance on self-reported measures of body size. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association of self-reported and directly assessed anthropometric data (body height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist, hip, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and chest circumference) with CRC risk in the EPIC-Norfolk study. DESIGN: A total of 20,608 participants with complete self-reported and measured height and weight and without any history of cancer were followed up an average of 11 years, during which 357 incident CRC cases were recorded. Hazard Ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: After adjustment for confounders, HRs among women in the highest quintile of the body size measure relative to the lowest quintile showed that measured height (HR=1.98, 95% CI=1.19-3.28, P (trend)=0.009), measured waist circumference (HR=1.65, 95% CI=0.97-2.86, P (trend)=0.009) and measured WHR (HR=2.07, 95% CI=1.17-3.67, P (trend)=0.001) were associated with increased CRC risk. Associations using corresponding self-reported measures were attenuated and not statistically significant. Conversely, the association of BMI with CRC risk in women was weaker using measured BMI (HR=1.57, 95% CI=0.91-2.73, P (trend)=0.05) compared with self-reported BMI (HR=1.97, 95% CI=1.18-3.30, P (trend)=0.02). In men no significantly increased CRC risk was observed with any of the anthropometric measures. CONCLUSIONS: Measured height, waist circumference and WHR were associated with CRC risk in women, whereas any significant associations with those measures were attenuated when self-reported data were used. SN - 1476-5497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21427695/Self_reported_and_measured_anthropometric_data_and_risk_of_colorectal_cancer_in_the_EPIC_Norfolk_study_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2011.61 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -