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Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering and body mass index in adolescents.
J Pediatr. 2011 Aug; 159(2):303-7.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To establish prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering within US adolescent body mass index (BMI) groups.

STUDY DESIGN

Data were obtained from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants (12-18 years, n = 2457) recruited from 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2007-2008 surveys. Prevalence of risk factor clustering (≥2 risk factors: triglycerides; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; systolic/diastolic blood pressure; fasting glucose) was determined within Centers for Disease Control-defined BMI groups (normal weight, <85(th) percentile; overweight, 85th to 94th percentile; obese, ≥95th percentile). Logistic regression examined associations of risk factor clustering within BMI groups for sex, race/ethnicity, income, household size, smoking, age, and BMI z-score.

RESULTS

Approximately 9%, 21%, and 35% of normal weight, overweight, and obese adolescents had risk factor clustering. Adolescents with risk factor clustering were less likely to be female (OR 95% CI: overweight, 0.33, 0.16-0.68; obese, 0.38, 0.18-0.78) and non-Hispanic black (normal weight, 0.31, 0.17-0.55; overweight, 0.22, 0.07-0.69; obese, 0.24, 0.12-0.50), but more likely to be a smoker (overweight: 4.32, 1.44-12.96), and have a higher BMI z-score (obese, 3.15, 1.29-7.68). Lower income was associated with risk factor clustering in overweight adolescents (0.28, 0.12-0.63), but a higher income was related to risk factor clustering in obese adolescents (1.90, 1.04-3.48).

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of risk factor clustering increases across adolescent BMI categories; however, associations with sex, race/ethnicity, income, smoking, and BMI vary across groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Population Science, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21429506

Citation

Camhi, Sarah M., and Peter T. Katzmarzyk. "Prevalence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factor Clustering and Body Mass Index in Adolescents." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 159, no. 2, 2011, pp. 303-7.
Camhi SM, Katzmarzyk PT. Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering and body mass index in adolescents. J Pediatr. 2011;159(2):303-7.
Camhi, S. M., & Katzmarzyk, P. T. (2011). Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering and body mass index in adolescents. The Journal of Pediatrics, 159(2), 303-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.01.059
Camhi SM, Katzmarzyk PT. Prevalence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factor Clustering and Body Mass Index in Adolescents. J Pediatr. 2011;159(2):303-7. PubMed PMID: 21429506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering and body mass index in adolescents. AU - Camhi,Sarah M, AU - Katzmarzyk,Peter T, Y1 - 2011/03/22/ PY - 2010/09/29/received PY - 2010/11/30/revised PY - 2011/01/26/accepted PY - 2011/3/25/entrez PY - 2011/3/25/pubmed PY - 2011/10/20/medline SP - 303 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 159 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To establish prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering within US adolescent body mass index (BMI) groups. STUDY DESIGN: Data were obtained from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants (12-18 years, n = 2457) recruited from 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2007-2008 surveys. Prevalence of risk factor clustering (≥2 risk factors: triglycerides; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; systolic/diastolic blood pressure; fasting glucose) was determined within Centers for Disease Control-defined BMI groups (normal weight, <85(th) percentile; overweight, 85th to 94th percentile; obese, ≥95th percentile). Logistic regression examined associations of risk factor clustering within BMI groups for sex, race/ethnicity, income, household size, smoking, age, and BMI z-score. RESULTS: Approximately 9%, 21%, and 35% of normal weight, overweight, and obese adolescents had risk factor clustering. Adolescents with risk factor clustering were less likely to be female (OR 95% CI: overweight, 0.33, 0.16-0.68; obese, 0.38, 0.18-0.78) and non-Hispanic black (normal weight, 0.31, 0.17-0.55; overweight, 0.22, 0.07-0.69; obese, 0.24, 0.12-0.50), but more likely to be a smoker (overweight: 4.32, 1.44-12.96), and have a higher BMI z-score (obese, 3.15, 1.29-7.68). Lower income was associated with risk factor clustering in overweight adolescents (0.28, 0.12-0.63), but a higher income was related to risk factor clustering in obese adolescents (1.90, 1.04-3.48). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of risk factor clustering increases across adolescent BMI categories; however, associations with sex, race/ethnicity, income, smoking, and BMI vary across groups. SN - 1097-6833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21429506/Prevalence_of_cardiometabolic_risk_factor_clustering_and_body_mass_index_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(11)00136-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -