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Residential exposure to outdoor air pollution during pregnancy and anthropometric measures at birth in a multicenter cohort in Spain.
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Sep; 119(9):1333-8.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A growing body of research suggests that prenatal exposure to air pollution may be harmful to fetal development. We assessed the association between exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and anthropometric measures at birth in four areas within the Spanish Children's Health and Environment (INMA) mother and child cohort study.

METHODS

Exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and benzene was estimated for the residence of each woman (n = 2,337) for each trimester and for the entire pregnancy. Outcomes included birth weight, length, and head circumference. The association between residential outdoor air pollution exposure and birth outcomes was assessed with linear regression models controlled for potential confounders. We also performed sensitivity analyses for the subset of women who spent more time at home during pregnancy. Finally, we performed a combined analysis with meta-analysis techniques.

RESULTS

In the combined analysis, an increase of 10 µg/m3 in NO2 exposure during pregnancy was associated with a decrease in birth length of -0.9 mm [95% confidence interval (CI), -1.8 to -0.1 mm]. For the subset of women who spent ≥ 15 hr/day at home, the association was stronger (-0.16 mm; 95% CI, -0.27 to -0.04). For this same subset of women, a reduction of 22 g in birth weight was associated with each 10-µg/m3 increase in NO2 exposure in the second trimester (95% CI, -45.3 to 1.9). We observed no significant relationship between benzene levels and birth outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

NO2 exposure was associated with reductions in both length and weight at birth. This association was clearer for the subset of women who spent more time at home.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Consortium for Research on Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Spain. estarlich_mar@gva.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21429861

Citation

Estarlich, Marisa, et al. "Residential Exposure to Outdoor Air Pollution During Pregnancy and Anthropometric Measures at Birth in a Multicenter Cohort in Spain." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 119, no. 9, 2011, pp. 1333-8.
Estarlich M, Ballester F, Aguilera I, et al. Residential exposure to outdoor air pollution during pregnancy and anthropometric measures at birth in a multicenter cohort in Spain. Environ Health Perspect. 2011;119(9):1333-8.
Estarlich, M., Ballester, F., Aguilera, I., Fernández-Somoano, A., Lertxundi, A., Llop, S., Freire, C., Tardón, A., Basterrechea, M., Sunyer, J., & Iñiguez, C. (2011). Residential exposure to outdoor air pollution during pregnancy and anthropometric measures at birth in a multicenter cohort in Spain. Environmental Health Perspectives, 119(9), 1333-8. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1002918
Estarlich M, et al. Residential Exposure to Outdoor Air Pollution During Pregnancy and Anthropometric Measures at Birth in a Multicenter Cohort in Spain. Environ Health Perspect. 2011;119(9):1333-8. PubMed PMID: 21429861.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Residential exposure to outdoor air pollution during pregnancy and anthropometric measures at birth in a multicenter cohort in Spain. AU - Estarlich,Marisa, AU - Ballester,Ferran, AU - Aguilera,Inmaculada, AU - Fernández-Somoano,Ana, AU - Lertxundi,Aitana, AU - Llop,Sabrina, AU - Freire,Carmen, AU - Tardón,Adonina, AU - Basterrechea,Mikel, AU - Sunyer,Jordi, AU - Iñiguez,Carmen, Y1 - 2011/03/23/ PY - 2010/08/31/received PY - 2011/03/23/accepted PY - 2011/3/25/entrez PY - 2011/3/25/pubmed PY - 2012/1/14/medline SP - 1333 EP - 8 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 119 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: A growing body of research suggests that prenatal exposure to air pollution may be harmful to fetal development. We assessed the association between exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and anthropometric measures at birth in four areas within the Spanish Children's Health and Environment (INMA) mother and child cohort study. METHODS: Exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and benzene was estimated for the residence of each woman (n = 2,337) for each trimester and for the entire pregnancy. Outcomes included birth weight, length, and head circumference. The association between residential outdoor air pollution exposure and birth outcomes was assessed with linear regression models controlled for potential confounders. We also performed sensitivity analyses for the subset of women who spent more time at home during pregnancy. Finally, we performed a combined analysis with meta-analysis techniques. RESULTS: In the combined analysis, an increase of 10 µg/m3 in NO2 exposure during pregnancy was associated with a decrease in birth length of -0.9 mm [95% confidence interval (CI), -1.8 to -0.1 mm]. For the subset of women who spent ≥ 15 hr/day at home, the association was stronger (-0.16 mm; 95% CI, -0.27 to -0.04). For this same subset of women, a reduction of 22 g in birth weight was associated with each 10-µg/m3 increase in NO2 exposure in the second trimester (95% CI, -45.3 to 1.9). We observed no significant relationship between benzene levels and birth outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: NO2 exposure was associated with reductions in both length and weight at birth. This association was clearer for the subset of women who spent more time at home. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21429861/Residential_exposure_to_outdoor_air_pollution_during_pregnancy_and_anthropometric_measures_at_birth_in_a_multicenter_cohort_in_Spain_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/ehp.1002918?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -