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Sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in men.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jun; 93(6):1321-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sugar-sweetened beverages are risk factors for type 2 diabetes; however, the role of artificially sweetened beverages is unclear.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to examine the associations of sugar- and artificially sweetened beverages with incident type 2 diabetes.

DESIGN

An analysis of healthy men (n = 40,389) from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a prospective cohort study, was performed. Cumulatively averaged intakes of sugar-sweetened (sodas, fruit punches, lemonades, fruit drinks) and artificially sweetened (diet sodas, diet drinks) beverages from food-frequency questionnaires were tested for associations with type 2 diabetes by using Cox regression.

RESULTS

There were 2680 cases over 20 y of follow-up. After age adjustment, the hazard ratio (HR) for the comparison of the top with the bottom quartile of sugar-sweetened beverage intake was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.39; P for trend < 0.01). After adjustment for confounders, including multivitamins, family history, high triglycerides at baseline, high blood pressure, diuretics, pre-enrollment weight change, dieting, total energy, and body mass index, the HR was 1.24 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.40; P for trend < 0.01). Intake of artificially sweetened beverages was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes in the age-adjusted analysis (HR: 1.91; 95% CI: 1.72, 2.11; P for trend < 0.01) but not in the multivariate-adjusted analysis (HR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.21; P for trend = 0.13). The replacement of one serving of sugar-sweetened beverage with 1 cup (≈237 mL) of coffee was associated with a risk reduction of 17%.

CONCLUSION

Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is associated with a significantly elevated risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas the association between artificially sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes was largely explained by health status, pre-enrollment weight change, dieting, and body mass index.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21430119

Citation

de Koning, Lawrence, et al. "Sugar-sweetened and Artificially Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 93, no. 6, 2011, pp. 1321-7.
de Koning L, Malik VS, Rimm EB, et al. Sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(6):1321-7.
de Koning, L., Malik, V. S., Rimm, E. B., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2011). Sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 93(6), 1321-7. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.110.007922
de Koning L, et al. Sugar-sweetened and Artificially Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(6):1321-7. PubMed PMID: 21430119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in men. AU - de Koning,Lawrence, AU - Malik,Vasanti S, AU - Rimm,Eric B, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Hu,Frank B, Y1 - 2011/03/23/ PY - 2011/3/25/entrez PY - 2011/3/25/pubmed PY - 2011/7/29/medline SP - 1321 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 93 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sugar-sweetened beverages are risk factors for type 2 diabetes; however, the role of artificially sweetened beverages is unclear. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the associations of sugar- and artificially sweetened beverages with incident type 2 diabetes. DESIGN: An analysis of healthy men (n = 40,389) from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a prospective cohort study, was performed. Cumulatively averaged intakes of sugar-sweetened (sodas, fruit punches, lemonades, fruit drinks) and artificially sweetened (diet sodas, diet drinks) beverages from food-frequency questionnaires were tested for associations with type 2 diabetes by using Cox regression. RESULTS: There were 2680 cases over 20 y of follow-up. After age adjustment, the hazard ratio (HR) for the comparison of the top with the bottom quartile of sugar-sweetened beverage intake was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.39; P for trend < 0.01). After adjustment for confounders, including multivitamins, family history, high triglycerides at baseline, high blood pressure, diuretics, pre-enrollment weight change, dieting, total energy, and body mass index, the HR was 1.24 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.40; P for trend < 0.01). Intake of artificially sweetened beverages was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes in the age-adjusted analysis (HR: 1.91; 95% CI: 1.72, 2.11; P for trend < 0.01) but not in the multivariate-adjusted analysis (HR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.21; P for trend = 0.13). The replacement of one serving of sugar-sweetened beverage with 1 cup (≈237 mL) of coffee was associated with a risk reduction of 17%. CONCLUSION: Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is associated with a significantly elevated risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas the association between artificially sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes was largely explained by health status, pre-enrollment weight change, dieting, and body mass index. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21430119/Sugar_sweetened_and_artificially_sweetened_beverage_consumption_and_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_in_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.110.007922 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -