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Sputum inflammatory cells and allergen-induced airway responses in allergic asthmatic subjects.
Allergy. 2011 Aug; 66(8):1075-80.A

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Allergen inhalation causes early and late bronchoconstrictor responses, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in allergic asthmatics. The role of airway inflammatory cells in causing allergen-induced bronchoconstriction and airway hyperresponsiveness is controversial. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between allergen-induced increases in airway inflammatory cells, early and late bronchoconstrictor responses and methacholine airway hyperresponsiveness.

METHODS

Allergen inhalation challenge was conducted in 50 allergic asthmatics. Changes in the forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV(1%)) were followed for 7 h, induced sputum was obtained at 7 and 24 h, and the provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV(1) (MCh PC(20)) was measured at 24 h.

RESULTS

There was a significant negative correlation between the baseline methacholine PC(20) and baseline sputum eosinophils (r = -0.512, P = 0.0001). Allergen-induced changes in methacholine PC(20) were also significantly negatively correlated to allergen-induced change in sputum eosinophils at 24 h (r = -0.434, P = 0.002), but not to changes in any other inflammatory cells. There were no significant correlations between sputum eosinophils or other inflammatory cells and the allergen-induced early or late asthmatic responses.

CONCLUSION

Allergen-induced increases in airway eosinophils in asthmatic dual responders may contribute to allergen-induced changes in methacholine PC(20) , but not the late asthmatic responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Michael G DeGroot School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21447082

Citation

Imaoka, H, et al. "Sputum Inflammatory Cells and Allergen-induced Airway Responses in Allergic Asthmatic Subjects." Allergy, vol. 66, no. 8, 2011, pp. 1075-80.
Imaoka H, Gauvreau GM, Watson RM, et al. Sputum inflammatory cells and allergen-induced airway responses in allergic asthmatic subjects. Allergy. 2011;66(8):1075-80.
Imaoka, H., Gauvreau, G. M., Watson, R. M., Strinich, T., Obminksi, G. L., Howie, K., Killian, K. J., & O'Byrne, P. M. (2011). Sputum inflammatory cells and allergen-induced airway responses in allergic asthmatic subjects. Allergy, 66(8), 1075-80. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2011.02588.x
Imaoka H, et al. Sputum Inflammatory Cells and Allergen-induced Airway Responses in Allergic Asthmatic Subjects. Allergy. 2011;66(8):1075-80. PubMed PMID: 21447082.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sputum inflammatory cells and allergen-induced airway responses in allergic asthmatic subjects. AU - Imaoka,H, AU - Gauvreau,G M, AU - Watson,R M, AU - Strinich,T, AU - Obminksi,G L, AU - Howie,K, AU - Killian,K J, AU - O'Byrne,P M, Y1 - 2011/03/30/ PY - 2011/3/31/entrez PY - 2011/3/31/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 1075 EP - 80 JF - Allergy JO - Allergy VL - 66 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Allergen inhalation causes early and late bronchoconstrictor responses, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in allergic asthmatics. The role of airway inflammatory cells in causing allergen-induced bronchoconstriction and airway hyperresponsiveness is controversial. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between allergen-induced increases in airway inflammatory cells, early and late bronchoconstrictor responses and methacholine airway hyperresponsiveness. METHODS: Allergen inhalation challenge was conducted in 50 allergic asthmatics. Changes in the forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV(1%)) were followed for 7 h, induced sputum was obtained at 7 and 24 h, and the provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV(1) (MCh PC(20)) was measured at 24 h. RESULTS: There was a significant negative correlation between the baseline methacholine PC(20) and baseline sputum eosinophils (r = -0.512, P = 0.0001). Allergen-induced changes in methacholine PC(20) were also significantly negatively correlated to allergen-induced change in sputum eosinophils at 24 h (r = -0.434, P = 0.002), but not to changes in any other inflammatory cells. There were no significant correlations between sputum eosinophils or other inflammatory cells and the allergen-induced early or late asthmatic responses. CONCLUSION: Allergen-induced increases in airway eosinophils in asthmatic dual responders may contribute to allergen-induced changes in methacholine PC(20) , but not the late asthmatic responses. SN - 1398-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21447082/Sputum_inflammatory_cells_and_allergen_induced_airway_responses_in_allergic_asthmatic_subjects_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2011.02588.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -