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Low-residue diet in diverticular disease: putting an end to a myth.
Nutr Clin Pract. 2011 Apr; 26(2):137-42.NC

Abstract

Residue refers to any indigestible food substance that remains in the intestinal tract and contributes to stool bulk. Historically, low-residue diets have been recommended for diverticulosis because of a concern that indigestible nuts, seeds, corn, and popcorn could enter, block, or irritate a diverticulum and result in diverticulitis and possibly increase the risk of perforation. To date, there is no evidence supporting such a practice. In contrast, dietary fiber supplementation has been advocated to prevent diverticula formation and recurrence of symptomatic diverticulosis, although this is based mostly on low-quality observational studies. This report focuses on the evidence that fiber intake may be beneficial in the prevention and recurrence of symptomatic and complicated diverticular disease and provides recommendations regarding fiber supplementation in individuals with diverticulosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic, 13400 East Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21447765

Citation

Tarleton, Sherry, and John K. DiBaise. "Low-residue Diet in Diverticular Disease: Putting an End to a Myth." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 26, no. 2, 2011, pp. 137-42.
Tarleton S, DiBaise JK. Low-residue diet in diverticular disease: putting an end to a myth. Nutr Clin Pract. 2011;26(2):137-42.
Tarleton, S., & DiBaise, J. K. (2011). Low-residue diet in diverticular disease: putting an end to a myth. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 26(2), 137-42. https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533611399774
Tarleton S, DiBaise JK. Low-residue Diet in Diverticular Disease: Putting an End to a Myth. Nutr Clin Pract. 2011;26(2):137-42. PubMed PMID: 21447765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low-residue diet in diverticular disease: putting an end to a myth. AU - Tarleton,Sherry, AU - DiBaise,John K, PY - 2011/3/31/entrez PY - 2011/3/31/pubmed PY - 2011/5/24/medline SP - 137 EP - 42 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - Residue refers to any indigestible food substance that remains in the intestinal tract and contributes to stool bulk. Historically, low-residue diets have been recommended for diverticulosis because of a concern that indigestible nuts, seeds, corn, and popcorn could enter, block, or irritate a diverticulum and result in diverticulitis and possibly increase the risk of perforation. To date, there is no evidence supporting such a practice. In contrast, dietary fiber supplementation has been advocated to prevent diverticula formation and recurrence of symptomatic diverticulosis, although this is based mostly on low-quality observational studies. This report focuses on the evidence that fiber intake may be beneficial in the prevention and recurrence of symptomatic and complicated diverticular disease and provides recommendations regarding fiber supplementation in individuals with diverticulosis. SN - 1941-2452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21447765/Low_residue_diet_in_diverticular_disease:_putting_an_end_to_a_myth_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533611399774 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -