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Low-volume interval training improves muscle oxidative capacity in sedentary adults.
Med Sci Sports Exerc 2011; 43(10):1849-56MS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

High-intensity interval training (HIT) increases skeletal muscle oxidative capacity similar to traditional endurance training, despite a low total exercise volume. Much of this work has focused on young active individuals, and it is unclear whether the results are applicable to older less active populations. In addition, many studies have used "all-out" variable-load exercise interventions (e.g., repeated Wingate tests) that may not be practical for all individuals. We therefore examined the effect of a more practical low-volume submaximal constant-load HIT protocol on skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and insulin sensitivity in middle-aged adults, who may be at a higher risk for inactivity-related disorders.

METHODS

Seven sedentary but otherwise healthy individuals (three women) with a mean ± SD age, body mass index, and peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)) of 45 ± 5 yr, 27 ± 5 kg·m(-2), and 30 ± 3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) performed six training sessions during 2 wk. Each session involved 10 × 1-min cycling at ∼60% of peak power achieved during a ramp VO(2peak) test (eliciting ∼80%-95% of HR reserve) with 1 min of recovery between intervals. Needle biopsy samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before training and ∼72 h after the final training session.

RESULTS

Muscle oxidative capacity, as reflected by the protein content of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV, increased by ∼35% after training. The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α was increased by ∼56% after training, but the transcriptional corepressor receptor-interacting protein 140 remained unchanged. Glucose transporter protein content increased ∼260%, and insulin sensitivity, on the basis of the insulin sensitivity index homeostasis model assessment, improved by ∼35% after training.

CONCLUSIONS

Constant-load low-volume HIT may be a practical time-efficient strategy to induce metabolic adaptations that reduce the risk for inactivity-related disorders in previously sedentary middle-aged adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21448086

Citation

Hood, Melanie S., et al. "Low-volume Interval Training Improves Muscle Oxidative Capacity in Sedentary Adults." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 43, no. 10, 2011, pp. 1849-56.
Hood MS, Little JP, Tarnopolsky MA, et al. Low-volume interval training improves muscle oxidative capacity in sedentary adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011;43(10):1849-56.
Hood, M. S., Little, J. P., Tarnopolsky, M. A., Myslik, F., & Gibala, M. J. (2011). Low-volume interval training improves muscle oxidative capacity in sedentary adults. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(10), pp. 1849-56. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182199834.
Hood MS, et al. Low-volume Interval Training Improves Muscle Oxidative Capacity in Sedentary Adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011;43(10):1849-56. PubMed PMID: 21448086.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low-volume interval training improves muscle oxidative capacity in sedentary adults. AU - Hood,Melanie S, AU - Little,Jonathan P, AU - Tarnopolsky,Mark A, AU - Myslik,Frank, AU - Gibala,Martin J, PY - 2011/3/31/entrez PY - 2011/3/31/pubmed PY - 2012/1/27/medline SP - 1849 EP - 56 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 43 IS - 10 N2 - INTRODUCTION: High-intensity interval training (HIT) increases skeletal muscle oxidative capacity similar to traditional endurance training, despite a low total exercise volume. Much of this work has focused on young active individuals, and it is unclear whether the results are applicable to older less active populations. In addition, many studies have used "all-out" variable-load exercise interventions (e.g., repeated Wingate tests) that may not be practical for all individuals. We therefore examined the effect of a more practical low-volume submaximal constant-load HIT protocol on skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and insulin sensitivity in middle-aged adults, who may be at a higher risk for inactivity-related disorders. METHODS: Seven sedentary but otherwise healthy individuals (three women) with a mean ± SD age, body mass index, and peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)) of 45 ± 5 yr, 27 ± 5 kg·m(-2), and 30 ± 3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) performed six training sessions during 2 wk. Each session involved 10 × 1-min cycling at ∼60% of peak power achieved during a ramp VO(2peak) test (eliciting ∼80%-95% of HR reserve) with 1 min of recovery between intervals. Needle biopsy samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before training and ∼72 h after the final training session. RESULTS: Muscle oxidative capacity, as reflected by the protein content of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV, increased by ∼35% after training. The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α was increased by ∼56% after training, but the transcriptional corepressor receptor-interacting protein 140 remained unchanged. Glucose transporter protein content increased ∼260%, and insulin sensitivity, on the basis of the insulin sensitivity index homeostasis model assessment, improved by ∼35% after training. CONCLUSIONS: Constant-load low-volume HIT may be a practical time-efficient strategy to induce metabolic adaptations that reduce the risk for inactivity-related disorders in previously sedentary middle-aged adults. SN - 1530-0315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21448086/Low_volume_interval_training_improves_muscle_oxidative_capacity_in_sedentary_adults_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=21448086 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -