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The influence of selenium-enriched milk proteins and selenium yeast on plasma selenium levels and rectal selenoprotein gene expression in human subjects.
Br J Nutr 2011; 106(4):572-82BJ

Abstract

Certain forms of dietary Se may have advantages for improving human Se status and regulating the risk for disease, such as cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study compared the effects of a Se-enriched milk protein (dairy-Se) with a Se-rich yeast (yeast-Se) on plasma Se levels and rectal selenoprotein gene expression since we reasoned that if these genes were not regulated, there was little potential for regulating the risk for CRC in this organ. A total of twenty-three healthy volunteers with plasma Se in the lower half of the population range were supplemented with dairy-Se (150 μg/d) or yeast-Se (150 μg/d) for 6 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of washout period. Blood was sampled every 2 weeks, and rectal biopsies were obtained before and after Se supplementation and after the washout period. Plasma Se levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and rectal mRNA of selenoprotein P (SeP), cytosolic GPx-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal GPx-2 (GPx-2) and thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) were measured. Plasma Se levels increased rapidly in both Se groups (P < 0·001); plasma GPx activity was not significantly changed. Rectal SeP mRNA increased at 6 weeks compared with baseline in both Se groups (P < 0·05); only dairy-Se resulted in a sustained elevation of SeP after the washout period (P < 0·05). Rectal GPx-1 and GPx-2 mRNA were higher with dairy-Se (P < 0·05) than with yeast-Se at 6 weeks. In conclusion, three rectal selenoprotein mRNA were differentially regulated by dairy-Se and yeast-Se. Changes in rectal selenoproteins are not predicted by changes in plasma Se; dairy-Se effectively regulates the expression of several rectal selenoproteins of relevance to the risk for CRC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Flinders Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia. ying.hu@flinders.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21450115

Citation

Hu, Ying, et al. "The Influence of Selenium-enriched Milk Proteins and Selenium Yeast On Plasma Selenium Levels and Rectal Selenoprotein Gene Expression in Human Subjects." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 106, no. 4, 2011, pp. 572-82.
Hu Y, McIntosh GH, Le Leu RK, et al. The influence of selenium-enriched milk proteins and selenium yeast on plasma selenium levels and rectal selenoprotein gene expression in human subjects. Br J Nutr. 2011;106(4):572-82.
Hu, Y., McIntosh, G. H., Le Leu, R. K., Upton, J. M., Woodman, R. J., & Young, G. P. (2011). The influence of selenium-enriched milk proteins and selenium yeast on plasma selenium levels and rectal selenoprotein gene expression in human subjects. The British Journal of Nutrition, 106(4), pp. 572-82. doi:10.1017/S0007114511000420.
Hu Y, et al. The Influence of Selenium-enriched Milk Proteins and Selenium Yeast On Plasma Selenium Levels and Rectal Selenoprotein Gene Expression in Human Subjects. Br J Nutr. 2011;106(4):572-82. PubMed PMID: 21450115.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of selenium-enriched milk proteins and selenium yeast on plasma selenium levels and rectal selenoprotein gene expression in human subjects. AU - Hu,Ying, AU - McIntosh,Graeme H, AU - Le Leu,Richard K, AU - Upton,Jane M, AU - Woodman,Richard J, AU - Young,Graeme P, Y1 - 2011/03/30/ PY - 2011/4/1/entrez PY - 2011/4/1/pubmed PY - 2011/10/1/medline SP - 572 EP - 82 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 106 IS - 4 N2 - Certain forms of dietary Se may have advantages for improving human Se status and regulating the risk for disease, such as cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study compared the effects of a Se-enriched milk protein (dairy-Se) with a Se-rich yeast (yeast-Se) on plasma Se levels and rectal selenoprotein gene expression since we reasoned that if these genes were not regulated, there was little potential for regulating the risk for CRC in this organ. A total of twenty-three healthy volunteers with plasma Se in the lower half of the population range were supplemented with dairy-Se (150 μg/d) or yeast-Se (150 μg/d) for 6 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of washout period. Blood was sampled every 2 weeks, and rectal biopsies were obtained before and after Se supplementation and after the washout period. Plasma Se levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and rectal mRNA of selenoprotein P (SeP), cytosolic GPx-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal GPx-2 (GPx-2) and thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) were measured. Plasma Se levels increased rapidly in both Se groups (P < 0·001); plasma GPx activity was not significantly changed. Rectal SeP mRNA increased at 6 weeks compared with baseline in both Se groups (P < 0·05); only dairy-Se resulted in a sustained elevation of SeP after the washout period (P < 0·05). Rectal GPx-1 and GPx-2 mRNA were higher with dairy-Se (P < 0·05) than with yeast-Se at 6 weeks. In conclusion, three rectal selenoprotein mRNA were differentially regulated by dairy-Se and yeast-Se. Changes in rectal selenoproteins are not predicted by changes in plasma Se; dairy-Se effectively regulates the expression of several rectal selenoproteins of relevance to the risk for CRC. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21450115/The_influence_of_selenium_enriched_milk_proteins_and_selenium_yeast_on_plasma_selenium_levels_and_rectal_selenoprotein_gene_expression_in_human_subjects_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114511000420/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -