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Risk of incident and fatal melanoma in individuals with a family history of incident or fatal melanoma or any cancer.
Br J Dermatol. 2011 Aug; 165(2):342-8.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A family history of melanoma is associated with an increased risk of melanoma and probably of other, discordant cancers. Limited data are available on familial mortality in melanoma. If fatal forms of melanoma were associated with fatal forms of melanoma or of some other cancers, only studies on familial mortality rather than on familial incidence might be able to detect them. Furthermore, estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis.

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was the estimation of familial aggregation of concordant melanoma and of melanoma and any other cancers based both on incidence and on mortality.

METHODS

We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for incident melanoma for relatives of any cancer patients and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for death from melanoma for relatives of individuals who died from any other cancer. Similar risks were determined for any common cancer when relatives were affected by melanoma.

RESULTS

For concordant melanoma, familial incidence equalled familial mortality, SIR=SMR. Familial clustering (SIRs increased) of melanoma and oesophageal, colorectal, breast, prostate, kidney, nervous system and connective tissue cancers and myeloma and leukaemia was observed. The SMRs for pancreatic and nervous system cancers were increased in relatives whose parents had died from melanoma.

CONCLUSIONS

These data should encourage a search for fatal subtypes of familial cancer, which may eventually have clinical implications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21457213

Citation

Brandt, A, et al. "Risk of Incident and Fatal Melanoma in Individuals With a Family History of Incident or Fatal Melanoma or Any Cancer." The British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 165, no. 2, 2011, pp. 342-8.
Brandt A, Sundquist J, Hemminki K. Risk of incident and fatal melanoma in individuals with a family history of incident or fatal melanoma or any cancer. Br J Dermatol. 2011;165(2):342-8.
Brandt, A., Sundquist, J., & Hemminki, K. (2011). Risk of incident and fatal melanoma in individuals with a family history of incident or fatal melanoma or any cancer. The British Journal of Dermatology, 165(2), 342-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10350.x
Brandt A, Sundquist J, Hemminki K. Risk of Incident and Fatal Melanoma in Individuals With a Family History of Incident or Fatal Melanoma or Any Cancer. Br J Dermatol. 2011;165(2):342-8. PubMed PMID: 21457213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of incident and fatal melanoma in individuals with a family history of incident or fatal melanoma or any cancer. AU - Brandt,A, AU - Sundquist,J, AU - Hemminki,K, Y1 - 2011/06/30/ PY - 2011/4/5/entrez PY - 2011/4/5/pubmed PY - 2011/10/18/medline SP - 342 EP - 8 JF - The British journal of dermatology JO - Br. J. Dermatol. VL - 165 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: A family history of melanoma is associated with an increased risk of melanoma and probably of other, discordant cancers. Limited data are available on familial mortality in melanoma. If fatal forms of melanoma were associated with fatal forms of melanoma or of some other cancers, only studies on familial mortality rather than on familial incidence might be able to detect them. Furthermore, estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was the estimation of familial aggregation of concordant melanoma and of melanoma and any other cancers based both on incidence and on mortality. METHODS: We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for incident melanoma for relatives of any cancer patients and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for death from melanoma for relatives of individuals who died from any other cancer. Similar risks were determined for any common cancer when relatives were affected by melanoma. RESULTS: For concordant melanoma, familial incidence equalled familial mortality, SIR=SMR. Familial clustering (SIRs increased) of melanoma and oesophageal, colorectal, breast, prostate, kidney, nervous system and connective tissue cancers and myeloma and leukaemia was observed. The SMRs for pancreatic and nervous system cancers were increased in relatives whose parents had died from melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: These data should encourage a search for fatal subtypes of familial cancer, which may eventually have clinical implications. SN - 1365-2133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21457213/Risk_of_incident_and_fatal_melanoma_in_individuals_with_a_family_history_of_incident_or_fatal_melanoma_or_any_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10350.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -