Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Social modulation of facial pain display in high-catastrophizing children: an observational study in schoolchildren and their parents.
Pain. 2011 Jul; 152(7):1591-1599.PAIN

Abstract

The present study examined existing communal and operant accounts of children's pain behavior by looking at the impact of parental presence and parental attention upon children's pain expression as a function of child pain catastrophizing. Participants were 38 school children and 1 of their parents. Children completed a cold pressor pain task (CPT) twice, first when told that no one was observing (alone condition) and subsequently when told that they were being observed by their parent (parent-present condition). A 3-minute parent-child interaction occurred between the 2 CPT immersions, allowing measurement of parental attention to their child's pain (ie, parental pain-attending talk vs non-pain-attending talk). Findings showed that child pain catastrophizing moderated the impact of parental presence upon facial displays of pain. Specifically, low-catastrophizing children expressed more pain in the presence of their parent, whereas high-catastrophizing children showed equally pronounced pain expression when alone or in the presence of a parent. Furthermore, children's catastrophizing moderated the impact of parental attention upon facial displays and self-reports of pain; higher levels of parental nonpain talk were associated with increased facial expression and self-reports of pain among high-catastrophizing children; for low-catastrophizing children, facial and self-report of pain was independent of parental attention to pain. The findings are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms that may drive and maintain pain expression in high-catastrophizing children, as well as potential limitations of traditional theories in explaining pediatric pain expression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium Department of Psychology, Medicine and Neurology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21459512

Citation

Vervoort, Tine, et al. "Social Modulation of Facial Pain Display in High-catastrophizing Children: an Observational Study in Schoolchildren and Their Parents." Pain, vol. 152, no. 7, 2011, pp. 1591-1599.
Vervoort T, Caes L, Trost Z, et al. Social modulation of facial pain display in high-catastrophizing children: an observational study in schoolchildren and their parents. Pain. 2011;152(7):1591-1599.
Vervoort, T., Caes, L., Trost, Z., Sullivan, M., Vangronsveld, K., & Goubert, L. (2011). Social modulation of facial pain display in high-catastrophizing children: an observational study in schoolchildren and their parents. Pain, 152(7), 1591-1599. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2011.02.048
Vervoort T, et al. Social Modulation of Facial Pain Display in High-catastrophizing Children: an Observational Study in Schoolchildren and Their Parents. Pain. 2011;152(7):1591-1599. PubMed PMID: 21459512.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social modulation of facial pain display in high-catastrophizing children: an observational study in schoolchildren and their parents. AU - Vervoort,Tine, AU - Caes,Line, AU - Trost,Zina, AU - Sullivan,Michael, AU - Vangronsveld,Karoline, AU - Goubert,Liesbet, Y1 - 2011/04/02/ PY - 2010/11/24/received PY - 2011/02/14/revised PY - 2011/02/24/accepted PY - 2011/4/5/entrez PY - 2011/4/5/pubmed PY - 2011/10/14/medline SP - 1591 EP - 1599 JF - Pain JO - Pain VL - 152 IS - 7 N2 - The present study examined existing communal and operant accounts of children's pain behavior by looking at the impact of parental presence and parental attention upon children's pain expression as a function of child pain catastrophizing. Participants were 38 school children and 1 of their parents. Children completed a cold pressor pain task (CPT) twice, first when told that no one was observing (alone condition) and subsequently when told that they were being observed by their parent (parent-present condition). A 3-minute parent-child interaction occurred between the 2 CPT immersions, allowing measurement of parental attention to their child's pain (ie, parental pain-attending talk vs non-pain-attending talk). Findings showed that child pain catastrophizing moderated the impact of parental presence upon facial displays of pain. Specifically, low-catastrophizing children expressed more pain in the presence of their parent, whereas high-catastrophizing children showed equally pronounced pain expression when alone or in the presence of a parent. Furthermore, children's catastrophizing moderated the impact of parental attention upon facial displays and self-reports of pain; higher levels of parental nonpain talk were associated with increased facial expression and self-reports of pain among high-catastrophizing children; for low-catastrophizing children, facial and self-report of pain was independent of parental attention to pain. The findings are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms that may drive and maintain pain expression in high-catastrophizing children, as well as potential limitations of traditional theories in explaining pediatric pain expression. SN - 1872-6623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21459512/Social_modulation_of_facial_pain_display_in_high_catastrophizing_children:_an_observational_study_in_schoolchildren_and_their_parents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/00006396-201107000-00024 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -