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Influence of respiratory variables on the on-line detection of exhaled trace gases by PTR-MS.
Thorax. 2011 Oct; 66(10):919-20.T

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Modern gas analysis techniques permit real time and on-line quantification of multiple volatile trace gases within a single exhalation. However, the influence of various respiratory manoeuvres affecting exhalation flow and the kinetics of metabolite release to the gas-phase remain largely unknown.

METHODS

We examined variation in the concentrations of selected trace gases over a range of expiratory flows (50; 100; 250 ml/s) and after 30 second periods of breathold and paced hyperventilation. On-line measurement of breath samples from healthy volunteers (n=10) was performed by proton transfer mass spectrometry.

RESULTS

Exhaled acetone increased with higher expiratory flow rate (805, 838, 898 ppb, p=0.02). Levels of methanol (206 vs 179 ppb, p<0.01), acetaldehyde (26 vs 22 ppb, p<0.01), ethanol (410 vs 208 ppb, p=0.01) and dimethyl sulphide (113 vs 103 ncps, p<0.01) fell significantly following 30s hyperventilation. After 30 second breathold levels of methanol (206 vs 217 ppb, p=0.02), acetone (805 vs 869 ppb, p<0.01), isoprene (348 vs 390 ppb, p=0.02) and dimethyl sulphide (113 vs 136 ncps, p=0.02) increased significantly. Variation in respiratory parameters did not significantly alters the level of acetonitrile, propanol and butyric acid within the breath of healthy subjects.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings demonstrate that respiratory manoeuvres significantly influence the measured concentration of a number of exhaled VOCs that are of potential importance within the clinical setting. Our results support the adoption of standardised practices for breath gas analysis by on-line and real time mass spectrometry methods.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Letter

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21474496

Citation

Boshier, Piers R., et al. "Influence of Respiratory Variables On the On-line Detection of Exhaled Trace Gases By PTR-MS." Thorax, vol. 66, no. 10, 2011, pp. 919-20.
Boshier PR, Priest OH, Hanna GB, et al. Influence of respiratory variables on the on-line detection of exhaled trace gases by PTR-MS. Thorax. 2011;66(10):919-20.
Boshier, P. R., Priest, O. H., Hanna, G. B., & Marczin, N. (2011). Influence of respiratory variables on the on-line detection of exhaled trace gases by PTR-MS. Thorax, 66(10), 919-20. https://doi.org/10.1136/thx.2011.161208
Boshier PR, et al. Influence of Respiratory Variables On the On-line Detection of Exhaled Trace Gases By PTR-MS. Thorax. 2011;66(10):919-20. PubMed PMID: 21474496.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of respiratory variables on the on-line detection of exhaled trace gases by PTR-MS. AU - Boshier,Piers R, AU - Priest,Oliver H, AU - Hanna,George B, AU - Marczin,Nandor, Y1 - 2011/04/07/ PY - 2011/4/9/entrez PY - 2011/4/9/pubmed PY - 2011/11/9/medline SP - 919 EP - 20 JF - Thorax JO - Thorax VL - 66 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Modern gas analysis techniques permit real time and on-line quantification of multiple volatile trace gases within a single exhalation. However, the influence of various respiratory manoeuvres affecting exhalation flow and the kinetics of metabolite release to the gas-phase remain largely unknown. METHODS: We examined variation in the concentrations of selected trace gases over a range of expiratory flows (50; 100; 250 ml/s) and after 30 second periods of breathold and paced hyperventilation. On-line measurement of breath samples from healthy volunteers (n=10) was performed by proton transfer mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Exhaled acetone increased with higher expiratory flow rate (805, 838, 898 ppb, p=0.02). Levels of methanol (206 vs 179 ppb, p<0.01), acetaldehyde (26 vs 22 ppb, p<0.01), ethanol (410 vs 208 ppb, p=0.01) and dimethyl sulphide (113 vs 103 ncps, p<0.01) fell significantly following 30s hyperventilation. After 30 second breathold levels of methanol (206 vs 217 ppb, p=0.02), acetone (805 vs 869 ppb, p<0.01), isoprene (348 vs 390 ppb, p=0.02) and dimethyl sulphide (113 vs 136 ncps, p=0.02) increased significantly. Variation in respiratory parameters did not significantly alters the level of acetonitrile, propanol and butyric acid within the breath of healthy subjects. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that respiratory manoeuvres significantly influence the measured concentration of a number of exhaled VOCs that are of potential importance within the clinical setting. Our results support the adoption of standardised practices for breath gas analysis by on-line and real time mass spectrometry methods. SN - 1468-3296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21474496/Influence_of_respiratory_variables_on_the_on_line_detection_of_exhaled_trace_gases_by_PTR_MS_ L2 - https://thorax.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=21474496 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -