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Clinical strategies to address patients' concerns in osteoporosis management with bisphosphonates.
Postgrad Med. 2011 Mar; 123(2):131-44.PM

Abstract

Approximately 44 million Americans either have, or are at risk of developing, osteoporosis, a disease associated with an increased risk of fracture and, consequently, morbidity and mortality. Osteoporosis affects 20% to 30% of postmenopausal women, and resulting fractures pose a major economic burden, with estimated annual direct costs ranging from $17 billion to $19 billion. Hip fractures account for the majority of costs (~60%) because they often require costly long-term follow-up care in addition to the direct costs of initial treatment. Screening, diagnosis, and disease management are of paramount importance when treating patients at risk for osteoporosis. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends that all postmenopausal women be evaluated for osteoporosis risk factors and that all women aged ≥ 65 years undergo bone mineral density testing. Once the primary care physician has identified a patient at risk for osteoporosis-related fracture, the physician must decide whether and how to treat the patient (ie, nonpharmacologic or pharmacologic options). Bisphosphonates are the first-line pharmacologic treatment for women aged ≥ 50 years with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates-which have a favorable safety and tolerability profile in clinical trials-have shown efficacy in reducing fractures. However, achieved real world effectiveness is very much dependent on good treatment adherence by the patient. Media attention to rare adverse events has motivated some patients to deliberate nonadherence. Physicians should screen patients for contraindications and adverse event risk factors, educate them on the risks of fracture and benefits and risks of treatment, and monitor them during therapy. To assist primary care physicians in clinical decision making for women at risk for or with confirmed osteoporosis, this article presents a review of the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, recent long-term efficacy data for extended-interval bisphosphonates, recent safety concerns with bisphosphonates, and lastly, suggests strategies for improving bisphosphonate adherence and patient outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Brooklyn, MI 49230, USA. recfcc@aol.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21474901

Citation

Cole, Raymond E.. "Clinical Strategies to Address Patients' Concerns in Osteoporosis Management With Bisphosphonates." Postgraduate Medicine, vol. 123, no. 2, 2011, pp. 131-44.
Cole RE. Clinical strategies to address patients' concerns in osteoporosis management with bisphosphonates. Postgrad Med. 2011;123(2):131-44.
Cole, R. E. (2011). Clinical strategies to address patients' concerns in osteoporosis management with bisphosphonates. Postgraduate Medicine, 123(2), 131-44. https://doi.org/10.3810/pgm.2011.03.2271
Cole RE. Clinical Strategies to Address Patients' Concerns in Osteoporosis Management With Bisphosphonates. Postgrad Med. 2011;123(2):131-44. PubMed PMID: 21474901.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical strategies to address patients' concerns in osteoporosis management with bisphosphonates. A1 - Cole,Raymond E, PY - 2011/4/9/entrez PY - 2011/4/9/pubmed PY - 2011/6/4/medline SP - 131 EP - 44 JF - Postgraduate medicine JO - Postgrad Med VL - 123 IS - 2 N2 - Approximately 44 million Americans either have, or are at risk of developing, osteoporosis, a disease associated with an increased risk of fracture and, consequently, morbidity and mortality. Osteoporosis affects 20% to 30% of postmenopausal women, and resulting fractures pose a major economic burden, with estimated annual direct costs ranging from $17 billion to $19 billion. Hip fractures account for the majority of costs (~60%) because they often require costly long-term follow-up care in addition to the direct costs of initial treatment. Screening, diagnosis, and disease management are of paramount importance when treating patients at risk for osteoporosis. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends that all postmenopausal women be evaluated for osteoporosis risk factors and that all women aged ≥ 65 years undergo bone mineral density testing. Once the primary care physician has identified a patient at risk for osteoporosis-related fracture, the physician must decide whether and how to treat the patient (ie, nonpharmacologic or pharmacologic options). Bisphosphonates are the first-line pharmacologic treatment for women aged ≥ 50 years with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates-which have a favorable safety and tolerability profile in clinical trials-have shown efficacy in reducing fractures. However, achieved real world effectiveness is very much dependent on good treatment adherence by the patient. Media attention to rare adverse events has motivated some patients to deliberate nonadherence. Physicians should screen patients for contraindications and adverse event risk factors, educate them on the risks of fracture and benefits and risks of treatment, and monitor them during therapy. To assist primary care physicians in clinical decision making for women at risk for or with confirmed osteoporosis, this article presents a review of the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, recent long-term efficacy data for extended-interval bisphosphonates, recent safety concerns with bisphosphonates, and lastly, suggests strategies for improving bisphosphonate adherence and patient outcomes. SN - 1941-9260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21474901/Clinical_strategies_to_address_patients'_concerns_in_osteoporosis_management_with_bisphosphonates_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3810/pgm.2011.03.2271 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -