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A twin study of genetic and environmental determinants of abnormal persistence of psychotic experiences in young adulthood.

Abstract

Evidence suggests that subclinical psychotic experiences are more likely to cause transition to psychotic disorder if their expression becomes persistent. The study of longitudinal patterns of subclinical psychotic experiences may help to distinguish subgroups with transient and persistent psychotic symptoms, who may differ in risk of later psychosis. The current study investigated patterns of developmental course of subclinical psychotic experiences in a general population sample of 566 female twins, aged 18-45 years. The positive symptoms subscale of the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), completed three times in 2 years, was analyzed with growth modeling. Using Latent Class Analysis, two developmental courses were distinguished: a Persistent and a Low (expression of subclinical psychotic experiences) group. The Persistent group reported significantly higher levels of depressive and negative symptoms and worse functioning in daily life. Childhood trauma (OR: 3.26, P < 0.0001) and stressful life events over the study period (OR: 3.15, P = 0.031) predicted membership of the Persistent group. Of the monozygotic (MZ) twins with their co-twin in the Persistent group, 49% also were in the Persistent group themselves (OR: 9.32, P < 0.0001), compared to only 14% in the dizygotic (DZ) co-twins (OR: 1.56, P = 0.42) (χ(2)(2) = 22.97; P < 0.001). The findings suggest that persistence of subclinical psychosis is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, providing the possibility to study the (possibly modifiable) etiology underlying the longitudinal process of persistence of the early expression of psychosis liability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands. J.T.W.Wigman@uu.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21480500

Citation

Wigman, Johanna T W., et al. "A Twin Study of Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Abnormal Persistence of Psychotic Experiences in Young Adulthood." American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics : the Official Publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, vol. 156B, no. 5, 2011, pp. 546-52.
Wigman JT, van Winkel R, Jacobs N, et al. A twin study of genetic and environmental determinants of abnormal persistence of psychotic experiences in young adulthood. Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2011;156B(5):546-52.
Wigman, J. T., van Winkel, R., Jacobs, N., Wichers, M., Derom, C., Thiery, E., ... van Os, J. (2011). A twin study of genetic and environmental determinants of abnormal persistence of psychotic experiences in young adulthood. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics : the Official Publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, 156B(5), pp. 546-52. doi:10.1002/ajmg.b.31193.
Wigman JT, et al. A Twin Study of Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Abnormal Persistence of Psychotic Experiences in Young Adulthood. Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2011;156B(5):546-52. PubMed PMID: 21480500.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A twin study of genetic and environmental determinants of abnormal persistence of psychotic experiences in young adulthood. AU - Wigman,Johanna T W, AU - van Winkel,Ruud, AU - Jacobs,Nele, AU - Wichers,Marieke, AU - Derom,Catherine, AU - Thiery,Evert, AU - Vollebergh,Wilma A M, AU - van Os,Jim, Y1 - 2011/04/07/ PY - 2010/10/19/received PY - 2011/03/15/accepted PY - 2011/4/12/entrez PY - 2011/4/12/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 546 EP - 52 JF - American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics JO - Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet. VL - 156B IS - 5 N2 - Evidence suggests that subclinical psychotic experiences are more likely to cause transition to psychotic disorder if their expression becomes persistent. The study of longitudinal patterns of subclinical psychotic experiences may help to distinguish subgroups with transient and persistent psychotic symptoms, who may differ in risk of later psychosis. The current study investigated patterns of developmental course of subclinical psychotic experiences in a general population sample of 566 female twins, aged 18-45 years. The positive symptoms subscale of the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), completed three times in 2 years, was analyzed with growth modeling. Using Latent Class Analysis, two developmental courses were distinguished: a Persistent and a Low (expression of subclinical psychotic experiences) group. The Persistent group reported significantly higher levels of depressive and negative symptoms and worse functioning in daily life. Childhood trauma (OR: 3.26, P < 0.0001) and stressful life events over the study period (OR: 3.15, P = 0.031) predicted membership of the Persistent group. Of the monozygotic (MZ) twins with their co-twin in the Persistent group, 49% also were in the Persistent group themselves (OR: 9.32, P < 0.0001), compared to only 14% in the dizygotic (DZ) co-twins (OR: 1.56, P = 0.42) (χ(2)(2) = 22.97; P < 0.001). The findings suggest that persistence of subclinical psychosis is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, providing the possibility to study the (possibly modifiable) etiology underlying the longitudinal process of persistence of the early expression of psychosis liability. SN - 1552-485X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21480500/A_twin_study_of_genetic_and_environmental_determinants_of_abnormal_persistence_of_psychotic_experiences_in_young_adulthood_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.b.31193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -