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The ratio of fish to meat in the diet is positively associated with favorable intake of food groups and nutrients among young Japanese women.

Abstract

Although fish and meat may exert opposing influences on chronic disease, information on the balance of intake between fish and meat to overall diet quality is limited, particularly in Japanese, who have a much higher fish intake than Western populations. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that intake balance between fish and meat is associated with food and nutrient intakes in young Japanese women. The subjects were 3716 Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 20 years. Diet was assessed by a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. The dietary ratio of fish to meat was calculated from fish and meat intakes as a temporal indicator of overall intake balance. The ratio of fish to meat intake was associated positively with intakes of vegetables, fruits, pulses, dairy products, and alcohol, and negatively with those of energy-containing beverages and fat and oils. At the nutrient level, the ratio of fish to meat intake was associated negatively with intakes of energy, total fat, saturated fatty acids, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin B(1), and zinc, and positively with those of protein, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, and key vitamins and minerals. After limiting analysis to nutrients derived from foods other than fish and meat, the ratio of fish to meat intake was positively associated with intakes of almost all vitamins and minerals examined. In conclusion, women who consumed more fish than meat (ratio >1) tended to choose more favorable food groups that included higher amounts of vegetables and fruits, resulting in a better profile of nutrient intake patterns.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

    , , ,

    Source

    Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) 31:3 2011 Mar pg 169-77

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Animals
    Asian Continental Ancestry Group
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dairy Products
    Diet
    Dietary Fats
    Dietary Fiber
    Energy Intake
    Fatty Acids, Omega-6
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Fishes
    Food
    Fruit
    Humans
    Linear Models
    Meat
    Micronutrients
    Multivariate Analysis
    Nutrition Surveys
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vegetables
    Vitamins
    Young Adult
    Zinc

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21481710

    Citation

    Okubo, Hitomi, et al. "The Ratio of Fish to Meat in the Diet Is Positively Associated With Favorable Intake of Food Groups and Nutrients Among Young Japanese Women." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 31, no. 3, 2011, pp. 169-77.
    Okubo H, Sasaki S, Murakami K, et al. The ratio of fish to meat in the diet is positively associated with favorable intake of food groups and nutrients among young Japanese women. Nutr Res. 2011;31(3):169-77.
    Okubo, H., Sasaki, S., Murakami, K., & Takahashi, Y. (2011). The ratio of fish to meat in the diet is positively associated with favorable intake of food groups and nutrients among young Japanese women. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 31(3), pp. 169-77. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2011.02.005.
    Okubo H, et al. The Ratio of Fish to Meat in the Diet Is Positively Associated With Favorable Intake of Food Groups and Nutrients Among Young Japanese Women. Nutr Res. 2011;31(3):169-77. PubMed PMID: 21481710.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The ratio of fish to meat in the diet is positively associated with favorable intake of food groups and nutrients among young Japanese women. AU - Okubo,Hitomi, AU - Sasaki,Satoshi, AU - Murakami,Kentaro, AU - Takahashi,Yoshiko, AU - ,, PY - 2010/10/25/received PY - 2011/02/16/revised PY - 2011/02/23/accepted PY - 2011/4/13/entrez PY - 2011/4/13/pubmed PY - 2011/7/20/medline SP - 169 EP - 77 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 31 IS - 3 N2 - Although fish and meat may exert opposing influences on chronic disease, information on the balance of intake between fish and meat to overall diet quality is limited, particularly in Japanese, who have a much higher fish intake than Western populations. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that intake balance between fish and meat is associated with food and nutrient intakes in young Japanese women. The subjects were 3716 Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 20 years. Diet was assessed by a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. The dietary ratio of fish to meat was calculated from fish and meat intakes as a temporal indicator of overall intake balance. The ratio of fish to meat intake was associated positively with intakes of vegetables, fruits, pulses, dairy products, and alcohol, and negatively with those of energy-containing beverages and fat and oils. At the nutrient level, the ratio of fish to meat intake was associated negatively with intakes of energy, total fat, saturated fatty acids, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin B(1), and zinc, and positively with those of protein, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, and key vitamins and minerals. After limiting analysis to nutrients derived from foods other than fish and meat, the ratio of fish to meat intake was positively associated with intakes of almost all vitamins and minerals examined. In conclusion, women who consumed more fish than meat (ratio >1) tended to choose more favorable food groups that included higher amounts of vegetables and fruits, resulting in a better profile of nutrient intake patterns. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21481710/The_ratio_of_fish_to_meat_in_the_diet_is_positively_associated_with_favorable_intake_of_food_groups_and_nutrients_among_young_Japanese_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(11)00027-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -