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Diets and hormonal levels in postmenopausal women with or without breast cancer.
Nutr Cancer. 2011; 63(4):514-24.NC

Abstract

The role of diet in breast cancer (BC) risk is unclear. Fiber could reduce BC risk, through the enterohepatic circulation of estrogens. We examined the relationship between diet and sex hormones in postmenopausal women with or without BC. Thirty-one postmenopausal women (10 omnivores, 11 vegetarians, and 10 BC omnivores) were recruited. Dietary records (5 days) and hormone levels (3 days) were evaluated on 4 occasions over 1 yr. Vegetarians showed a lower fat/fiber ratio, a higher intake of total and cereal fiber (g/d)/body weight (kg), a significantly lower level of plasma estrone-sulfate, estradiol, free-estradiol, free-testosterone, and ring D oxygenated estrogens, and a significantly higher level of sex-hormone-binding-globulin than BC subjects. Fiber was consumed in slightly larger amounts by omnivores than by BC subjects. Omnivores had significantly lower plasma testosterone and estrone-sulfate but higher sex-hormone-binding-globulin than BC subjects. No difference was found for the urinary 16-oxygenated estrogens. However, the 2-MeO-E1/2-OH-E1 ratio was significantly lower in omnivores than in BC group. This ratio is positively associated with the fat/fiber ratio. In conclusion, testosterone may contribute to causing alterations in the levels of catechol estrogens and 16-oxygenated estrogens. The fat/fiber ratio appears to be useful in evaluating dietary effects on estrogen metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Folkhälsan Research Center, Institute for Preventive Medicine, Nutrition and Cancer, and Division of Clinical Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. mylene.aubertin-leheudre@helsinki.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21500098

Citation

Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène, et al. "Diets and Hormonal Levels in Postmenopausal Women With or Without Breast Cancer." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 63, no. 4, 2011, pp. 514-24.
Aubertin-Leheudre M, Hämäläinen E, Adlercreutz H. Diets and hormonal levels in postmenopausal women with or without breast cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2011;63(4):514-24.
Aubertin-Leheudre, M., Hämäläinen, E., & Adlercreutz, H. (2011). Diets and hormonal levels in postmenopausal women with or without breast cancer. Nutrition and Cancer, 63(4), 514-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2011.538487
Aubertin-Leheudre M, Hämäläinen E, Adlercreutz H. Diets and Hormonal Levels in Postmenopausal Women With or Without Breast Cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2011;63(4):514-24. PubMed PMID: 21500098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diets and hormonal levels in postmenopausal women with or without breast cancer. AU - Aubertin-Leheudre,Mylène, AU - Hämäläinen,Esa, AU - Adlercreutz,Herman, PY - 2011/4/19/entrez PY - 2011/4/19/pubmed PY - 2011/9/13/medline SP - 514 EP - 24 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 63 IS - 4 N2 - The role of diet in breast cancer (BC) risk is unclear. Fiber could reduce BC risk, through the enterohepatic circulation of estrogens. We examined the relationship between diet and sex hormones in postmenopausal women with or without BC. Thirty-one postmenopausal women (10 omnivores, 11 vegetarians, and 10 BC omnivores) were recruited. Dietary records (5 days) and hormone levels (3 days) were evaluated on 4 occasions over 1 yr. Vegetarians showed a lower fat/fiber ratio, a higher intake of total and cereal fiber (g/d)/body weight (kg), a significantly lower level of plasma estrone-sulfate, estradiol, free-estradiol, free-testosterone, and ring D oxygenated estrogens, and a significantly higher level of sex-hormone-binding-globulin than BC subjects. Fiber was consumed in slightly larger amounts by omnivores than by BC subjects. Omnivores had significantly lower plasma testosterone and estrone-sulfate but higher sex-hormone-binding-globulin than BC subjects. No difference was found for the urinary 16-oxygenated estrogens. However, the 2-MeO-E1/2-OH-E1 ratio was significantly lower in omnivores than in BC group. This ratio is positively associated with the fat/fiber ratio. In conclusion, testosterone may contribute to causing alterations in the levels of catechol estrogens and 16-oxygenated estrogens. The fat/fiber ratio appears to be useful in evaluating dietary effects on estrogen metabolism. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21500098/Diets_and_hormonal_levels_in_postmenopausal_women_with_or_without_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2011.538487 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -