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Random interbreeding between cryptic lineages of the Common Raven: evidence for speciation in reverse.
Mol Ecol. 2011 Jun; 20(11):2390-402.ME

Abstract

DNA sequence studies frequently reveal evidence of cryptic lineages in morphologically uniform species, many of which turn out to be evolutionarily distinct species. The Common Raven (Corvus corax) includes two deeply divergent mtDNA lineages: one lineage seems restricted to western North America and the other is Holarctic in distribution. These deep clades hint of the possibility of cryptic species in the western United States. We tested this hypothesis in a population consisting of an equal proportion of both mtDNA clades, by quantifying mating patterns and associated fitness consequences with respect to mtDNA. We also tested for morphological, behavioural and ecological correlates of sex and mtDNA clade membership. Mate pairings were random with respect to mtDNA clades, and there were no differences in reproductive success between assortatively and nonassortatively mated pairs. We found no differences in survival or resource use between clades. There were no differences in morphological or behavioural characters between mtDNA clades, except one clade trended towards greater mobility. These results suggest there are no barriers to gene flow between mtDNA clades and argue that the mtDNA clades have remerged in this population, likely due to a lack of ecological or signal differentiation between individuals in each lineage. Hence, in Common Ravens, phylogeographic structure in mtDNA is a reflection of likely past isolation rather than currently differentiated species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of the Environment, University of Washington, Box 352100, Seattle, WA 98195-2100, USA. webb@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21518060

Citation

Webb, William C., et al. "Random Interbreeding Between Cryptic Lineages of the Common Raven: Evidence for Speciation in Reverse." Molecular Ecology, vol. 20, no. 11, 2011, pp. 2390-402.
Webb WC, Marzluff JM, Omland KE. Random interbreeding between cryptic lineages of the Common Raven: evidence for speciation in reverse. Mol Ecol. 2011;20(11):2390-402.
Webb, W. C., Marzluff, J. M., & Omland, K. E. (2011). Random interbreeding between cryptic lineages of the Common Raven: evidence for speciation in reverse. Molecular Ecology, 20(11), 2390-402. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05095.x
Webb WC, Marzluff JM, Omland KE. Random Interbreeding Between Cryptic Lineages of the Common Raven: Evidence for Speciation in Reverse. Mol Ecol. 2011;20(11):2390-402. PubMed PMID: 21518060.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Random interbreeding between cryptic lineages of the Common Raven: evidence for speciation in reverse. AU - Webb,William C, AU - Marzluff,John M, AU - Omland,Kevin E, Y1 - 2011/04/22/ PY - 2011/4/27/entrez PY - 2011/4/27/pubmed PY - 2011/9/1/medline SP - 2390 EP - 402 JF - Molecular ecology JO - Mol. Ecol. VL - 20 IS - 11 N2 - DNA sequence studies frequently reveal evidence of cryptic lineages in morphologically uniform species, many of which turn out to be evolutionarily distinct species. The Common Raven (Corvus corax) includes two deeply divergent mtDNA lineages: one lineage seems restricted to western North America and the other is Holarctic in distribution. These deep clades hint of the possibility of cryptic species in the western United States. We tested this hypothesis in a population consisting of an equal proportion of both mtDNA clades, by quantifying mating patterns and associated fitness consequences with respect to mtDNA. We also tested for morphological, behavioural and ecological correlates of sex and mtDNA clade membership. Mate pairings were random with respect to mtDNA clades, and there were no differences in reproductive success between assortatively and nonassortatively mated pairs. We found no differences in survival or resource use between clades. There were no differences in morphological or behavioural characters between mtDNA clades, except one clade trended towards greater mobility. These results suggest there are no barriers to gene flow between mtDNA clades and argue that the mtDNA clades have remerged in this population, likely due to a lack of ecological or signal differentiation between individuals in each lineage. Hence, in Common Ravens, phylogeographic structure in mtDNA is a reflection of likely past isolation rather than currently differentiated species. SN - 1365-294X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21518060/Random_interbreeding_between_cryptic_lineages_of_the_Common_Raven:_evidence_for_speciation_in_reverse_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05095.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -