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Patellofemoral pain syndrome alters neuromuscular control and kinetics during stair ambulation.
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2011 Aug; 21(4):645-51.JE

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate differences in frontal plane knee kinetics, onset timing and duration of the gluteus medius (GMed), adductor longus (AL), and vastus medialis oblique (VMO) during stair ambulation between those with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Twenty PFPS patients and twenty healthy participants completed stair ambulation while surface electromyography (EMG), video, and ground reaction forces were collected. PFPS patients had a higher peak internal knee abduction moment during stair ascent, and a higher internal knee abduction impulse for both ascent and descent. During stair ascent, PFPS patients displayed earlier onset of the AL and later onset of GMed, compared to the healthy individuals. Also, PFPS patients had longer activation duration of the AL and shorter activation durations of the VMO and GMed during stair ascent. During stair descent, PFPS patients displayed delayed GMed onset and shorter activation duration of GMed and VMO. The results of the study suggest that altered neuromuscular control of the medial thigh musculature may be an important contributor to PFPS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA. Naoko.Aminaka2@utoledo.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21524921

Citation

Aminaka, Naoko, et al. "Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome Alters Neuromuscular Control and Kinetics During Stair Ambulation." Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology : Official Journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology, vol. 21, no. 4, 2011, pp. 645-51.
Aminaka N, Pietrosimone BG, Armstrong CW, et al. Patellofemoral pain syndrome alters neuromuscular control and kinetics during stair ambulation. J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2011;21(4):645-51.
Aminaka, N., Pietrosimone, B. G., Armstrong, C. W., Meszaros, A., & Gribble, P. A. (2011). Patellofemoral pain syndrome alters neuromuscular control and kinetics during stair ambulation. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology : Official Journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology, 21(4), 645-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2011.03.007
Aminaka N, et al. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome Alters Neuromuscular Control and Kinetics During Stair Ambulation. J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2011;21(4):645-51. PubMed PMID: 21524921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patellofemoral pain syndrome alters neuromuscular control and kinetics during stair ambulation. AU - Aminaka,Naoko, AU - Pietrosimone,Brian G, AU - Armstrong,Charles W, AU - Meszaros,Andrew, AU - Gribble,Phillip A, Y1 - 2011/04/27/ PY - 2010/11/29/received PY - 2011/03/16/revised PY - 2011/03/27/accepted PY - 2011/4/29/entrez PY - 2011/4/29/pubmed PY - 2011/11/4/medline SP - 645 EP - 51 JF - Journal of electromyography and kinesiology : official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology JO - J Electromyogr Kinesiol VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - The aim of the study was to investigate differences in frontal plane knee kinetics, onset timing and duration of the gluteus medius (GMed), adductor longus (AL), and vastus medialis oblique (VMO) during stair ambulation between those with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Twenty PFPS patients and twenty healthy participants completed stair ambulation while surface electromyography (EMG), video, and ground reaction forces were collected. PFPS patients had a higher peak internal knee abduction moment during stair ascent, and a higher internal knee abduction impulse for both ascent and descent. During stair ascent, PFPS patients displayed earlier onset of the AL and later onset of GMed, compared to the healthy individuals. Also, PFPS patients had longer activation duration of the AL and shorter activation durations of the VMO and GMed during stair ascent. During stair descent, PFPS patients displayed delayed GMed onset and shorter activation duration of GMed and VMO. The results of the study suggest that altered neuromuscular control of the medial thigh musculature may be an important contributor to PFPS. SN - 1873-5711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21524921/Patellofemoral_pain_syndrome_alters_neuromuscular_control_and_kinetics_during_stair_ambulation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1050-6411(11)00038-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -