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Meat consumption, cooking practices, meat mutagens, and risk of prostate cancer.
Nutr Cancer. 2011; 63(4):525-37.NC

Abstract

Consumption of red meat, particularly well-done meat, has been associated with increased prostate cancer risk. High-temperature cooking methods such as grilling and barbecuing may produce heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are known carcinogens. We assessed the association with meat consumption and estimated HCA and PAH exposure in a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer. Newly diagnosed cases aged 40-79 years (531 advanced cases, 195 localized cases) and 527 controls were asked about dietary intake, including usual meat cooking methods and doneness levels. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. For advanced prostate cancer, but not localized disease, increased risks were associated with higher consumption of hamburgers (OR = 1.79, CI = 1.10-2.92), processed meat (OR = 1.57, CI = 1.04-2.36), grilled red meat (OR = 1.63, CI = 0.99-2.68), and well-done red meat (OR = 1.52, CI = 0.93-2.46), and intermediate intake of 2-amino-1-methyl1-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (Quartile 2 vs. 1: OR = 1.41, CI = 0.98-2.01; Quartile 3 vs. 1: OR = 1.42, CI = 0.98-2.04), but not for higher intake. White meat consumption was not associated with prostate cancer. These findings provide further evidence that consumption of processed meat and red meat cooked at high temperature is associated with increased risk of advanced, but not localized, prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California 94538, USA. esther.john@CPIC.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21526454

Citation

John, Esther M., et al. "Meat Consumption, Cooking Practices, Meat Mutagens, and Risk of Prostate Cancer." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 63, no. 4, 2011, pp. 525-37.
John EM, Stern MC, Sinha R, et al. Meat consumption, cooking practices, meat mutagens, and risk of prostate cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2011;63(4):525-37.
John, E. M., Stern, M. C., Sinha, R., & Koo, J. (2011). Meat consumption, cooking practices, meat mutagens, and risk of prostate cancer. Nutrition and Cancer, 63(4), 525-37. https://doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2011.539311
John EM, et al. Meat Consumption, Cooking Practices, Meat Mutagens, and Risk of Prostate Cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2011;63(4):525-37. PubMed PMID: 21526454.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat consumption, cooking practices, meat mutagens, and risk of prostate cancer. AU - John,Esther M, AU - Stern,Mariana C, AU - Sinha,Rashmi, AU - Koo,Jocelyn, PY - 2011/4/29/entrez PY - 2011/4/29/pubmed PY - 2011/9/13/medline SP - 525 EP - 37 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 63 IS - 4 N2 - Consumption of red meat, particularly well-done meat, has been associated with increased prostate cancer risk. High-temperature cooking methods such as grilling and barbecuing may produce heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are known carcinogens. We assessed the association with meat consumption and estimated HCA and PAH exposure in a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer. Newly diagnosed cases aged 40-79 years (531 advanced cases, 195 localized cases) and 527 controls were asked about dietary intake, including usual meat cooking methods and doneness levels. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. For advanced prostate cancer, but not localized disease, increased risks were associated with higher consumption of hamburgers (OR = 1.79, CI = 1.10-2.92), processed meat (OR = 1.57, CI = 1.04-2.36), grilled red meat (OR = 1.63, CI = 0.99-2.68), and well-done red meat (OR = 1.52, CI = 0.93-2.46), and intermediate intake of 2-amino-1-methyl1-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (Quartile 2 vs. 1: OR = 1.41, CI = 0.98-2.01; Quartile 3 vs. 1: OR = 1.42, CI = 0.98-2.04), but not for higher intake. White meat consumption was not associated with prostate cancer. These findings provide further evidence that consumption of processed meat and red meat cooked at high temperature is associated with increased risk of advanced, but not localized, prostate cancer. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21526454/Meat_consumption_cooking_practices_meat_mutagens_and_risk_of_prostate_cancer_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2011.539311 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -