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Well-done meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposures in relation to breast cancer risk: the Nashville Breast Health Study.
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011 Oct; 129(3):919-28.BC

Abstract

Previous studies of the association of meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposure with breast cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We evaluated this association in a population-based case-control study of incident breast cancer conducted in Nashville, Tennessee, United States, including 2,386 breast cancer cases and 1,703 healthy women controls. Telephone interviews were conducted to obtain information related to meat intake including amount, cooking methods, and doneness levels, as well as other known or hypothesized risk factors for breast cancer. Unconditional logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios (ORs) after adjusting for potential confounders. High intake of red meat was associated with a significantly elevated risk of breast cancer (P-trend < 0.001). The association was particularly strong for high intake of well-done red meat (P-trend < 0.001), with an adjusted OR of 1.5 (95% CI = 1.3-1.9) for the highest versus the lowest quartile. Associations between red meat and breast cancer risk were slightly stronger for postmenopausal women than for premenopausal women. Meat-derived mutagens such as 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women only (P-trend = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively). The results from this study provide strong support for the hypotheses that high red meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposure may be associated with an increase in breast cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2525 West End Avenue, 8th floor, Suite 800, Nashville, TN 37203-1738, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21537933

Citation

Fu, Zhenming, et al. "Well-done Meat Intake and Meat-derived Mutagen Exposures in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk: the Nashville Breast Health Study." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 129, no. 3, 2011, pp. 919-28.
Fu Z, Deming SL, Fair AM, et al. Well-done meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposures in relation to breast cancer risk: the Nashville Breast Health Study. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011;129(3):919-28.
Fu, Z., Deming, S. L., Fair, A. M., Shrubsole, M. J., Wujcik, D. M., Shu, X. O., Kelley, M., & Zheng, W. (2011). Well-done meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposures in relation to breast cancer risk: the Nashville Breast Health Study. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 129(3), 919-28. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-011-1538-7
Fu Z, et al. Well-done Meat Intake and Meat-derived Mutagen Exposures in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk: the Nashville Breast Health Study. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011;129(3):919-28. PubMed PMID: 21537933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Well-done meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposures in relation to breast cancer risk: the Nashville Breast Health Study. AU - Fu,Zhenming, AU - Deming,Sandra L, AU - Fair,Alecia M, AU - Shrubsole,Martha J, AU - Wujcik,Debra M, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, AU - Kelley,Mark, AU - Zheng,Wei, Y1 - 2011/05/03/ PY - 2010/11/22/received PY - 2011/04/19/accepted PY - 2011/5/4/entrez PY - 2011/5/4/pubmed PY - 2012/9/14/medline SP - 919 EP - 28 JF - Breast cancer research and treatment JO - Breast Cancer Res Treat VL - 129 IS - 3 N2 - Previous studies of the association of meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposure with breast cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We evaluated this association in a population-based case-control study of incident breast cancer conducted in Nashville, Tennessee, United States, including 2,386 breast cancer cases and 1,703 healthy women controls. Telephone interviews were conducted to obtain information related to meat intake including amount, cooking methods, and doneness levels, as well as other known or hypothesized risk factors for breast cancer. Unconditional logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios (ORs) after adjusting for potential confounders. High intake of red meat was associated with a significantly elevated risk of breast cancer (P-trend < 0.001). The association was particularly strong for high intake of well-done red meat (P-trend < 0.001), with an adjusted OR of 1.5 (95% CI = 1.3-1.9) for the highest versus the lowest quartile. Associations between red meat and breast cancer risk were slightly stronger for postmenopausal women than for premenopausal women. Meat-derived mutagens such as 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women only (P-trend = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively). The results from this study provide strong support for the hypotheses that high red meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposure may be associated with an increase in breast cancer risk. SN - 1573-7217 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21537933/Well_done_meat_intake_and_meat_derived_mutagen_exposures_in_relation_to_breast_cancer_risk:_the_Nashville_Breast_Health_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-011-1538-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -