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Knowledge, attitudes, and practices on malaria prevention among Chinese international travelers.
J Travel Med. 2011 May-Jun; 18(3):173-7.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To address the lack of understanding in malaria prevention among Chinese international travelers, we have conducted knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) study in five different Chinese geographic areas. This survey represents one part of the background information needed to analyze imported malaria.

METHODS

Standardized questionnaires were distributed to Chinese international travelers in departure lounges at international airports in Guangzhou, Beijing, Shanghai, Qingdao, and Nanjing. The data were entered into the Epidata 3.1 (Jens M. Lauritsen, Odense, Denmark) and analyzed by the SPSS 12.0 statistical package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA).

RESULTS

Overall 2,495 completed questionnaires were collected from departing Chinese passengers; 1,573 were contributed by travelers who were going to malaria risk countries. More than half of all travelers spent less than 7 days to organize their trip abroad. Pre-travel medical advice was sought by 998 travelers (40.0%), 65.1% of them did so for 1-7 days before departure. Only 4.0% travelers received their knowledge from travel health providers. Among 389 travelers who were going to high malaria risk countries, only 18.0% realized that there is a high malaria risk in sub-Saharan Africa. Most travelers going to risk areas knew about personal protection measures against mosquito bites, but only 21.4% and 12.1% carried mosquito repellents or insecticides, respectively. Only 18.7% of the 1,573 potentially exposed travelers carried malaria tablets, all of them for self-treatment, none for prophylaxis.

CONCLUSION

KAP about malaria among exposed Chinese travelers is far from satisfactory. To reduce the rate of imported malaria, specific educational tools should be developed for those at high risk to make them understand and become compliant with chemoprophylaxis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Guangdong International Travel Healthcare Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People's Republic of China. zhangminchinese@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21539656

Citation

Zhang, Min, et al. "Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices On Malaria Prevention Among Chinese International Travelers." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 18, no. 3, 2011, pp. 173-7.
Zhang M, Liu Z, He H, et al. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices on malaria prevention among Chinese international travelers. J Travel Med. 2011;18(3):173-7.
Zhang, M., Liu, Z., He, H., Luo, L., Wang, S., Bu, H., & Zhou, X. (2011). Knowledge, attitudes, and practices on malaria prevention among Chinese international travelers. Journal of Travel Medicine, 18(3), 173-7. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2011.00512.x
Zhang M, et al. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices On Malaria Prevention Among Chinese International Travelers. J Travel Med. 2011 May-Jun;18(3):173-7. PubMed PMID: 21539656.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge, attitudes, and practices on malaria prevention among Chinese international travelers. AU - Zhang,Min, AU - Liu,Zhiyong, AU - He,Hongtao, AU - Luo,Lan, AU - Wang,Shunqing, AU - Bu,Honglei, AU - Zhou,Xian, Y1 - 2011/04/06/ PY - 2011/5/5/entrez PY - 2011/5/5/pubmed PY - 2011/10/14/medline SP - 173 EP - 7 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: To address the lack of understanding in malaria prevention among Chinese international travelers, we have conducted knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) study in five different Chinese geographic areas. This survey represents one part of the background information needed to analyze imported malaria. METHODS: Standardized questionnaires were distributed to Chinese international travelers in departure lounges at international airports in Guangzhou, Beijing, Shanghai, Qingdao, and Nanjing. The data were entered into the Epidata 3.1 (Jens M. Lauritsen, Odense, Denmark) and analyzed by the SPSS 12.0 statistical package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). RESULTS: Overall 2,495 completed questionnaires were collected from departing Chinese passengers; 1,573 were contributed by travelers who were going to malaria risk countries. More than half of all travelers spent less than 7 days to organize their trip abroad. Pre-travel medical advice was sought by 998 travelers (40.0%), 65.1% of them did so for 1-7 days before departure. Only 4.0% travelers received their knowledge from travel health providers. Among 389 travelers who were going to high malaria risk countries, only 18.0% realized that there is a high malaria risk in sub-Saharan Africa. Most travelers going to risk areas knew about personal protection measures against mosquito bites, but only 21.4% and 12.1% carried mosquito repellents or insecticides, respectively. Only 18.7% of the 1,573 potentially exposed travelers carried malaria tablets, all of them for self-treatment, none for prophylaxis. CONCLUSION: KAP about malaria among exposed Chinese travelers is far from satisfactory. To reduce the rate of imported malaria, specific educational tools should be developed for those at high risk to make them understand and become compliant with chemoprophylaxis. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21539656/Knowledge_attitudes_and_practices_on_malaria_prevention_among_Chinese_international_travelers_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2011.00512.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -