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Motor vehicle exposure and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.
Eur J Cancer. 2011 Jul; 47(10):1446-9.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The introduction of motor vehicles in industrialised countries during the mid 20th century seems to fit with the increasing incidence and the strong male predominance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The aim of the study was to test this new hypothesis in a large case-control study.

METHODS

A nationwide, Swedish, population-based case-control study included 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and 820 frequency-matched controls during 1995-1997. Tumours were uniformly classified. Exposure data were collected at face-to-face interviews. Odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were estimated and adjusted for confounding in multivariable logistic regression models.

RESULTS

There were no associations between regular contact with cars or airplanes regarding duration, frequency and age of contact and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The adjusted ORs for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, cardia adenocarcinoma and oesophageal squamous-cell carcinoma among persons spending at least two hours per day in cars were 1.3 (95%CI 0.7-2.3), 1.2 (95%CI 0.7-1.8), and 0.7 (95%CI 0.4-1.3), respectively. The corresponding ORs among frequent airplane passengers were 0.8 (95%CI 0.2-2.3), 1.1 (95%CI 0.5-2.2), and 0.9 (95%CI 0.3-2.5), respectively.

CONCLUSION

This large, population based case-control study does not support the hypothesis that frequent contact with motor vehicles has contributed to the increasing incidence or the male predominance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Jesper.lagergren@ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21570825

Citation

Lagergren, Jesper, et al. "Motor Vehicle Exposure and Risk of Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma." European Journal of Cancer (Oxford, England : 1990), vol. 47, no. 10, 2011, pp. 1446-9.
Lagergren J, Jansson C, Lu Y. Motor vehicle exposure and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Eur J Cancer. 2011;47(10):1446-9.
Lagergren, J., Jansson, C., & Lu, Y. (2011). Motor vehicle exposure and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. European Journal of Cancer (Oxford, England : 1990), 47(10), 1446-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2011.04.017
Lagergren J, Jansson C, Lu Y. Motor Vehicle Exposure and Risk of Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma. Eur J Cancer. 2011;47(10):1446-9. PubMed PMID: 21570825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Motor vehicle exposure and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. AU - Lagergren,Jesper, AU - Jansson,Catarina, AU - Lu,Yunxia, Y1 - 2011/05/12/ PY - 2011/03/24/received PY - 2011/04/09/revised PY - 2011/04/11/accepted PY - 2011/5/17/entrez PY - 2011/5/17/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 1446 EP - 9 JF - European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) JO - Eur. J. Cancer VL - 47 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The introduction of motor vehicles in industrialised countries during the mid 20th century seems to fit with the increasing incidence and the strong male predominance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The aim of the study was to test this new hypothesis in a large case-control study. METHODS: A nationwide, Swedish, population-based case-control study included 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and 820 frequency-matched controls during 1995-1997. Tumours were uniformly classified. Exposure data were collected at face-to-face interviews. Odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were estimated and adjusted for confounding in multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: There were no associations between regular contact with cars or airplanes regarding duration, frequency and age of contact and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The adjusted ORs for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, cardia adenocarcinoma and oesophageal squamous-cell carcinoma among persons spending at least two hours per day in cars were 1.3 (95%CI 0.7-2.3), 1.2 (95%CI 0.7-1.8), and 0.7 (95%CI 0.4-1.3), respectively. The corresponding ORs among frequent airplane passengers were 0.8 (95%CI 0.2-2.3), 1.1 (95%CI 0.5-2.2), and 0.9 (95%CI 0.3-2.5), respectively. CONCLUSION: This large, population based case-control study does not support the hypothesis that frequent contact with motor vehicles has contributed to the increasing incidence or the male predominance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. SN - 1879-0852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21570825/Motor_vehicle_exposure_and_risk_of_oesophageal_adenocarcinoma_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0959-8049(11)00266-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -