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A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD.
Pediatrics 2011; 127(6):e1575-84Ped

Abstract

The United Kingdom and European Union recently restricted the use of artificial food colorings (AFCs) to improve the health of children. These decisions provide an interesting case study of the role of scientific evidence in the assessment of food additives and risk to children's health and formulation of food policy. Although there continues to be uncertainty concerning the link between AFCs and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), policy decisions have been made that have far-reaching implications. In addition, publicity surrounding the policy changes may shape public perceptions concerning effective management of ADHD. We believe that the balance of existing evidence neither refutes nor supports the link between AFCs and ADHD, which highlights the need for carefully designed studies to further investigate the link between AFCs and ADHD. In this article we describe a model for such studies. In developing our model, we drew from current investigative standards in ADHD research, such as those used in the landmark Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. These standards encompass methodologic considerations including sample selection, outcome assessment, and data analyses. It is our hope that this model research methodology may prove valuable in addressing design considerations in future studies of AFCs and ADHD with the goal of producing reliable data that will enable policy-makers to better formulate effective, evidence-based food-policy decisions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. rkleinman@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21576306

Citation

Kleinman, Ronald E., et al. "A Research Model for Investigating the Effects of Artificial Food Colorings On Children With ADHD." Pediatrics, vol. 127, no. 6, 2011, pp. e1575-84.
Kleinman RE, Brown RT, Cutter GR, et al. A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD. Pediatrics. 2011;127(6):e1575-84.
Kleinman, R. E., Brown, R. T., Cutter, G. R., Dupaul, G. J., & Clydesdale, F. M. (2011). A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD. Pediatrics, 127(6), pp. e1575-84. doi:10.1542/peds.2009-2206.
Kleinman RE, et al. A Research Model for Investigating the Effects of Artificial Food Colorings On Children With ADHD. Pediatrics. 2011;127(6):e1575-84. PubMed PMID: 21576306.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD. AU - Kleinman,Ronald E, AU - Brown,Ronald T, AU - Cutter,Gary R, AU - Dupaul,George J, AU - Clydesdale,Fergus M, Y1 - 2011/05/16/ PY - 2011/5/18/entrez PY - 2011/5/18/pubmed PY - 2011/8/10/medline SP - e1575 EP - 84 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 127 IS - 6 N2 - The United Kingdom and European Union recently restricted the use of artificial food colorings (AFCs) to improve the health of children. These decisions provide an interesting case study of the role of scientific evidence in the assessment of food additives and risk to children's health and formulation of food policy. Although there continues to be uncertainty concerning the link between AFCs and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), policy decisions have been made that have far-reaching implications. In addition, publicity surrounding the policy changes may shape public perceptions concerning effective management of ADHD. We believe that the balance of existing evidence neither refutes nor supports the link between AFCs and ADHD, which highlights the need for carefully designed studies to further investigate the link between AFCs and ADHD. In this article we describe a model for such studies. In developing our model, we drew from current investigative standards in ADHD research, such as those used in the landmark Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. These standards encompass methodologic considerations including sample selection, outcome assessment, and data analyses. It is our hope that this model research methodology may prove valuable in addressing design considerations in future studies of AFCs and ADHD with the goal of producing reliable data that will enable policy-makers to better formulate effective, evidence-based food-policy decisions. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21576306/A_research_model_for_investigating_the_effects_of_artificial_food_colorings_on_children_with_ADHD_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=21576306 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -