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Wolbachia-mediated persistence of mtDNA from a potentially extinct species.
Mol Ecol. 2011 Jul; 20(13):2805-17.ME

Abstract

Drosophila quinaria is polymorphic for infection with Wolbachia, a maternally transmitted endosymbiont. Wolbachia-infected individuals carry mtDNA that is only distantly related to the mtDNA of uninfected individuals, and the clade encompassing all mtDNA haplotypes within D. quinaria also includes the mtDNA of several other species of Drosophila. Nuclear gene variation reveals no difference between the Wolbachia-infected and uninfected individuals of D. quinaria, indicating that they all belong to the same interbreeding biological species. We suggest that the Wolbachia and the mtDNA with which it is associated were derived via interspecific hybridization and introgression. The sequences in the Wolbachia and the associated mtDNA are ≥6% divergent from those of any known Drosophila species. Thus, in spite of nearly complete species sampling, the sequences from which these mitochondria were derived remain unknown, raising the possibility that the donor species is extinct. The association between Wolbachia infection and mtDNA type within D. quinaria suggests that Wolbachia may be required for the continued persistence of the mtDNA from an otherwise extinct Drosophila species. We hypothesize that pathogen-protective effects conferred by Wolbachia operate in a negative frequency-dependent manner, thus bringing about a stable polymorphism for Wolbachia infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. kdyer@uga.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21595768

Citation

Dyer, Kelly A., et al. "Wolbachia-mediated Persistence of mtDNA From a Potentially Extinct Species." Molecular Ecology, vol. 20, no. 13, 2011, pp. 2805-17.
Dyer KA, Burke C, Jaenike J. Wolbachia-mediated persistence of mtDNA from a potentially extinct species. Mol Ecol. 2011;20(13):2805-17.
Dyer, K. A., Burke, C., & Jaenike, J. (2011). Wolbachia-mediated persistence of mtDNA from a potentially extinct species. Molecular Ecology, 20(13), 2805-17. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05128.x
Dyer KA, Burke C, Jaenike J. Wolbachia-mediated Persistence of mtDNA From a Potentially Extinct Species. Mol Ecol. 2011;20(13):2805-17. PubMed PMID: 21595768.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Wolbachia-mediated persistence of mtDNA from a potentially extinct species. AU - Dyer,Kelly A, AU - Burke,Crista, AU - Jaenike,John, Y1 - 2011/05/20/ PY - 2011/5/21/entrez PY - 2011/5/21/pubmed PY - 2012/12/12/medline SP - 2805 EP - 17 JF - Molecular ecology JO - Mol. Ecol. VL - 20 IS - 13 N2 - Drosophila quinaria is polymorphic for infection with Wolbachia, a maternally transmitted endosymbiont. Wolbachia-infected individuals carry mtDNA that is only distantly related to the mtDNA of uninfected individuals, and the clade encompassing all mtDNA haplotypes within D. quinaria also includes the mtDNA of several other species of Drosophila. Nuclear gene variation reveals no difference between the Wolbachia-infected and uninfected individuals of D. quinaria, indicating that they all belong to the same interbreeding biological species. We suggest that the Wolbachia and the mtDNA with which it is associated were derived via interspecific hybridization and introgression. The sequences in the Wolbachia and the associated mtDNA are ≥6% divergent from those of any known Drosophila species. Thus, in spite of nearly complete species sampling, the sequences from which these mitochondria were derived remain unknown, raising the possibility that the donor species is extinct. The association between Wolbachia infection and mtDNA type within D. quinaria suggests that Wolbachia may be required for the continued persistence of the mtDNA from an otherwise extinct Drosophila species. We hypothesize that pathogen-protective effects conferred by Wolbachia operate in a negative frequency-dependent manner, thus bringing about a stable polymorphism for Wolbachia infection. SN - 1365-294X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21595768/Wolbachia_mediated_persistence_of_mtDNA_from_a_potentially_extinct_species_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05128.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -