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Low bone mass in microscopic colitis.
BMC Gastroenterol 2011; 11:58BG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Microscopic colitis presents with similar symptoms to classic inflammatory bowel diseases. Osteoporosis is a common complication of Crohn's disease but there are no data concerning bone metabolism in microscopic colitis.

AIMS

The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone density and metabolism in patients with microscopic colitis.

METHODS

Fourteen patients microscopic colitis were included in the study, and 28 healthy persons and 28 age and gender matched Crohn's disease patients were enrolled as controls. Bone mineral density was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine, femoral neck and the radius. Serum bone formation and bone resorption markers (osteocalcin and beta-crosslaps, respectively) were measured using immunoassays.

RESULTS

Low bone mass was measured in 57.14% patients with microscopic colitis. Bone mineral density at the femoral neck in patients suffering from microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease was lower than in healthy controls (0.852 ± 0.165 and 0.807 ± 0.136 vs. 1.056 ± 0.126 g/cm²; p < 0.01). Bone mineral density at the non-dominant radius was decreased in microscopic colitis patients (0.565 ± 0.093 vs. 0.667 ± 0.072 g/cm²; p < 0.05) but unaffected in Crohn's disease patients (0.672 ± 0.056 g/cm²). Mean beta-crosslaps concentration was higher in microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease patients than controls (417.714 ± 250.37 and 466.071 ± 249.96 vs. 264.75 ± 138.65 pg/ml; p < 0.05). A negative correlation between beta-crosslaps concentration and the femoral and radius t-scores was evident in microscopic colitis patients.

CONCLUSIONS

Low bone mass is frequent in microscopic colitis, and alterations to bone metabolism are similar to those present in Crohn's disease. Therefore, microscopic colitis-associated osteopenia could be a significant problem in such patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21595910

Citation

Lorinczy, Katalin, et al. "Low Bone Mass in Microscopic Colitis." BMC Gastroenterology, vol. 11, 2011, p. 58.
Lorinczy K, Lakatos G, Müllner K, et al. Low bone mass in microscopic colitis. BMC Gastroenterol. 2011;11:58.
Lorinczy, K., Lakatos, G., Müllner, K., Hritz, I., Lakatos, P. L., Tulassay, Z., & Miheller, P. (2011). Low bone mass in microscopic colitis. BMC Gastroenterology, 11, p. 58. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-11-58.
Lorinczy K, et al. Low Bone Mass in Microscopic Colitis. BMC Gastroenterol. 2011 May 19;11:58. PubMed PMID: 21595910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low bone mass in microscopic colitis. AU - Lorinczy,Katalin, AU - Lakatos,Gábor, AU - Müllner,Katalin, AU - Hritz,István, AU - Lakatos,Péter László, AU - Tulassay,Zsolt, AU - Miheller,Pál, Y1 - 2011/05/19/ PY - 2010/06/29/received PY - 2011/05/19/accepted PY - 2011/5/21/entrez PY - 2011/5/21/pubmed PY - 2011/10/25/medline SP - 58 EP - 58 JF - BMC gastroenterology JO - BMC Gastroenterol VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Microscopic colitis presents with similar symptoms to classic inflammatory bowel diseases. Osteoporosis is a common complication of Crohn's disease but there are no data concerning bone metabolism in microscopic colitis. AIMS: The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone density and metabolism in patients with microscopic colitis. METHODS: Fourteen patients microscopic colitis were included in the study, and 28 healthy persons and 28 age and gender matched Crohn's disease patients were enrolled as controls. Bone mineral density was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine, femoral neck and the radius. Serum bone formation and bone resorption markers (osteocalcin and beta-crosslaps, respectively) were measured using immunoassays. RESULTS: Low bone mass was measured in 57.14% patients with microscopic colitis. Bone mineral density at the femoral neck in patients suffering from microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease was lower than in healthy controls (0.852 ± 0.165 and 0.807 ± 0.136 vs. 1.056 ± 0.126 g/cm²; p < 0.01). Bone mineral density at the non-dominant radius was decreased in microscopic colitis patients (0.565 ± 0.093 vs. 0.667 ± 0.072 g/cm²; p < 0.05) but unaffected in Crohn's disease patients (0.672 ± 0.056 g/cm²). Mean beta-crosslaps concentration was higher in microscopic colitis and Crohn's disease patients than controls (417.714 ± 250.37 and 466.071 ± 249.96 vs. 264.75 ± 138.65 pg/ml; p < 0.05). A negative correlation between beta-crosslaps concentration and the femoral and radius t-scores was evident in microscopic colitis patients. CONCLUSIONS: Low bone mass is frequent in microscopic colitis, and alterations to bone metabolism are similar to those present in Crohn's disease. Therefore, microscopic colitis-associated osteopenia could be a significant problem in such patients. SN - 1471-230X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21595910/Low_bone_mass_in_microscopic_colitis_ L2 - https://bmcgastroenterol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-230X-11-58 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -