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Efficacy of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: a single-blinded, double-dummy, randomized controlled trial.
Pain. 2011 Aug; 152(8):1864-71.PAIN

Abstract

Insufficient clinical trial data were available to prove the efficacy of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis. A multicenter, double-dummy, single-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the outpatient departments of acupuncture at 5 hospitals in China to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture. A total of 140 patients with migraine without aura were recruited and assigned randomly to 2 different groups: the acupuncture group treated with verum acupuncture plus placebo and the control group treated with sham acupuncture plus flunarizine. Treated by acupuncture 3 times per week and drugs every night, patients from both groups were evaluated at week 0 (baseline), week 4, and week 16. The primary outcome was measured by the proportion of responders (defined as the proportion of patients with a reduction of migraine days by at least 50%). The secondary outcome measures included the number of migraine days, visual analogue scale (VAS, 0 to 10 cm) for pain, as well as the physical and mental component summary scores of the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36). The patients in the acupuncture group had better responder rates and fewer migraine days compared with the control group (P<.05), whereas there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in VAS scores and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores (P>.05). The results suggested that acupuncture was more effective than flunarizine in decreasing days of migraine attacks, whereas no significantly differences were found between acupuncture and flunarizine in reduction of pain intensity and improvement of the quality of life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital affiliated with Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. wlp5558@sina.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21616596

Citation

Wang, Lin-Peng, et al. "Efficacy of Acupuncture for Migraine Prophylaxis: a Single-blinded, Double-dummy, Randomized Controlled Trial." Pain, vol. 152, no. 8, 2011, pp. 1864-71.
Wang LP, Zhang XZ, Guo J, et al. Efficacy of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: a single-blinded, double-dummy, randomized controlled trial. Pain. 2011;152(8):1864-71.
Wang, L. P., Zhang, X. Z., Guo, J., Liu, H. L., Zhang, Y., Liu, C. Z., Yi, J. H., Wang, L. P., Zhao, J. P., & Li, S. S. (2011). Efficacy of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: a single-blinded, double-dummy, randomized controlled trial. Pain, 152(8), 1864-71. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2011.04.006
Wang LP, et al. Efficacy of Acupuncture for Migraine Prophylaxis: a Single-blinded, Double-dummy, Randomized Controlled Trial. Pain. 2011;152(8):1864-71. PubMed PMID: 21616596.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: a single-blinded, double-dummy, randomized controlled trial. AU - Wang,Lin-Peng, AU - Zhang,Xiao-Zhe, AU - Guo,Jia, AU - Liu,Hui-Lin, AU - Zhang,Yan, AU - Liu,Cun-Zhi, AU - Yi,Jing-Hong, AU - Wang,Li-Ping, AU - Zhao,Ji-Ping, AU - Li,Shan-Shan, Y1 - 2011/05/26/ PY - 2010/10/20/received PY - 2011/03/25/revised PY - 2011/04/04/accepted PY - 2011/5/28/entrez PY - 2011/5/28/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 1864 EP - 71 JF - Pain JO - Pain VL - 152 IS - 8 N2 - Insufficient clinical trial data were available to prove the efficacy of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis. A multicenter, double-dummy, single-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the outpatient departments of acupuncture at 5 hospitals in China to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture. A total of 140 patients with migraine without aura were recruited and assigned randomly to 2 different groups: the acupuncture group treated with verum acupuncture plus placebo and the control group treated with sham acupuncture plus flunarizine. Treated by acupuncture 3 times per week and drugs every night, patients from both groups were evaluated at week 0 (baseline), week 4, and week 16. The primary outcome was measured by the proportion of responders (defined as the proportion of patients with a reduction of migraine days by at least 50%). The secondary outcome measures included the number of migraine days, visual analogue scale (VAS, 0 to 10 cm) for pain, as well as the physical and mental component summary scores of the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36). The patients in the acupuncture group had better responder rates and fewer migraine days compared with the control group (P<.05), whereas there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in VAS scores and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores (P>.05). The results suggested that acupuncture was more effective than flunarizine in decreasing days of migraine attacks, whereas no significantly differences were found between acupuncture and flunarizine in reduction of pain intensity and improvement of the quality of life. SN - 1872-6623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21616596/Efficacy_of_acupuncture_for_migraine_prophylaxis:_a_single_blinded_double_dummy_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3959(11)00267-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -