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Prevalence and predictors of sleep difficulty in a national cohort of women with primary breast cancer three to four months postsurgery.
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2011 Nov; 42(5):710-20.JP

Abstract

CONTEXT

Mounting evidence suggests that many cancer patients suffer from sleep difficulty, but there is conflicting evidence regarding the prevalence and predictors of this adverse symptom.

OBJECTIVES

The present study investigated the prevalence and predictors of clinically significant sleep difficulty in women with primary breast cancer.

METHODS

Danish women (n=3343) with primary breast cancer completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) along with measures of depression, anxiety, physical activity/functioning, and health behaviors three to four months postsurgery. Data on disease status, treatment, and comorbidity were obtained from the Danish Cancer Cooperative Group and surgical departments, and information on sociodemographic factors and psychiatric history was obtained from Danish national longitudinal registries.

RESULTS

More than half (57.9%) of the women reported clinically significant sleep difficulty (PSQI >5). Multiple logistic regression identified seven significant predictors of sleep difficulty in the full sample. In order of strength, these were the following: more depressive symptoms, poorer physical functioning, older age, higher levels of trait anxiety, consuming more cigarettes, having undergone lumpectomy, and lower levels of physical activity. Subgroup analysis found that more depressive symptoms and poorer physical functioning were the only two predictors that were significant in both pre- and postmenopausal women.

CONCLUSION

These findings indicate that a high proportion of women with breast cancer experience sleep difficulty. Depression and poorer physical functioning appear to be robust predictors of sleep difficulty, whereas other predictors may depend on sample characteristics, including menopausal status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. b.colagiuri@unsw.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21620648

Citation

Colagiuri, Ben, et al. "Prevalence and Predictors of Sleep Difficulty in a National Cohort of Women With Primary Breast Cancer Three to Four Months Postsurgery." Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, vol. 42, no. 5, 2011, pp. 710-20.
Colagiuri B, Christensen S, Jensen AB, et al. Prevalence and predictors of sleep difficulty in a national cohort of women with primary breast cancer three to four months postsurgery. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2011;42(5):710-20.
Colagiuri, B., Christensen, S., Jensen, A. B., Price, M. A., Butow, P. N., & Zachariae, R. (2011). Prevalence and predictors of sleep difficulty in a national cohort of women with primary breast cancer three to four months postsurgery. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 42(5), 710-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2011.02.012
Colagiuri B, et al. Prevalence and Predictors of Sleep Difficulty in a National Cohort of Women With Primary Breast Cancer Three to Four Months Postsurgery. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2011;42(5):710-20. PubMed PMID: 21620648.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and predictors of sleep difficulty in a national cohort of women with primary breast cancer three to four months postsurgery. AU - Colagiuri,Ben, AU - Christensen,Søren, AU - Jensen,Anders B, AU - Price,Melanie A, AU - Butow,Phyllis N, AU - Zachariae,Robert, Y1 - 2011/05/26/ PY - 2010/10/28/received PY - 2011/02/04/revised PY - 2011/02/06/accepted PY - 2011/5/31/entrez PY - 2011/5/31/pubmed PY - 2012/3/1/medline SP - 710 EP - 20 JF - Journal of pain and symptom management JO - J Pain Symptom Manage VL - 42 IS - 5 N2 - CONTEXT: Mounting evidence suggests that many cancer patients suffer from sleep difficulty, but there is conflicting evidence regarding the prevalence and predictors of this adverse symptom. OBJECTIVES: The present study investigated the prevalence and predictors of clinically significant sleep difficulty in women with primary breast cancer. METHODS: Danish women (n=3343) with primary breast cancer completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) along with measures of depression, anxiety, physical activity/functioning, and health behaviors three to four months postsurgery. Data on disease status, treatment, and comorbidity were obtained from the Danish Cancer Cooperative Group and surgical departments, and information on sociodemographic factors and psychiatric history was obtained from Danish national longitudinal registries. RESULTS: More than half (57.9%) of the women reported clinically significant sleep difficulty (PSQI >5). Multiple logistic regression identified seven significant predictors of sleep difficulty in the full sample. In order of strength, these were the following: more depressive symptoms, poorer physical functioning, older age, higher levels of trait anxiety, consuming more cigarettes, having undergone lumpectomy, and lower levels of physical activity. Subgroup analysis found that more depressive symptoms and poorer physical functioning were the only two predictors that were significant in both pre- and postmenopausal women. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that a high proportion of women with breast cancer experience sleep difficulty. Depression and poorer physical functioning appear to be robust predictors of sleep difficulty, whereas other predictors may depend on sample characteristics, including menopausal status. SN - 1873-6513 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21620648/Prevalence_and_predictors_of_sleep_difficulty_in_a_national_cohort_of_women_with_primary_breast_cancer_three_to_four_months_postsurgery_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0885-3924(11)00155-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -