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Prolactin in response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men and women.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2011 Nov; 36(10):1530-9.P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Serum levels of the anterior pituitary hormone prolactin have been reported to increase in response to different types of psychological stressors in humans. However, experimental laboratory stress studies investigating the acute response of prolactin to psychological stress show inconsistent results as increased, as well as decreased or unchanged levels of prolactin have been reported.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute psychosocial stress on serum concentrations of prolactin in healthy men and women and possible sex differences.

METHOD

Thirty men and 15 women (age 30-50 years) underwent Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a tool for investigating psychobiological stress responses in a laboratory setting. Blood samples were collected before and directly after the stress test and after 30 min of recovery.

RESULTS

We observed significantly elevated prolactin levels - along with significantly increased plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol, heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) - in response to the stressor. The prolactin response pattern did not differ between men and women, but there was some indication that women might have higher magnitude of response. Large individual differences regarding the magnitude of response were seen in general. The magnitude of the prolactin response was significantly related to the magnitude of the response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and, to some extent, the cardiovascular responses, indicating that individual differences in prolactin response in healthy men and women are dependent on the general physiological stress activation. In women, the magnitude of response was also related to estradiol level.

CONCLUSION

Prolactin does increase in response to psychosocial stress, however, with large individual variation in magnitude of response. The pattern of prolactin response does not differ between men and women. However, there was some indication that women might have higher magnitude of increase than men, and that the magnitude of response in women was dependent on estradiol levels, and this needs to be further studied.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Institute of Stress Medicine, Göteborg, Sweden. anna-karin.lennartsson@vgregion.seNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21621331

Citation

Lennartsson, Anna-Karin, and Ingibjörg H. Jonsdottir. "Prolactin in Response to Acute Psychosocial Stress in Healthy Men and Women." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 36, no. 10, 2011, pp. 1530-9.
Lennartsson AK, Jonsdottir IH. Prolactin in response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men and women. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2011;36(10):1530-9.
Lennartsson, A. K., & Jonsdottir, I. H. (2011). Prolactin in response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men and women. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 36(10), 1530-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2011.04.007
Lennartsson AK, Jonsdottir IH. Prolactin in Response to Acute Psychosocial Stress in Healthy Men and Women. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2011;36(10):1530-9. PubMed PMID: 21621331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prolactin in response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men and women. AU - Lennartsson,Anna-Karin, AU - Jonsdottir,Ingibjörg H, Y1 - 2011/05/28/ PY - 2010/09/03/received PY - 2011/04/18/revised PY - 2011/04/18/accepted PY - 2011/5/31/entrez PY - 2011/5/31/pubmed PY - 2012/3/6/medline SP - 1530 EP - 9 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 36 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Serum levels of the anterior pituitary hormone prolactin have been reported to increase in response to different types of psychological stressors in humans. However, experimental laboratory stress studies investigating the acute response of prolactin to psychological stress show inconsistent results as increased, as well as decreased or unchanged levels of prolactin have been reported. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute psychosocial stress on serum concentrations of prolactin in healthy men and women and possible sex differences. METHOD: Thirty men and 15 women (age 30-50 years) underwent Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a tool for investigating psychobiological stress responses in a laboratory setting. Blood samples were collected before and directly after the stress test and after 30 min of recovery. RESULTS: We observed significantly elevated prolactin levels - along with significantly increased plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol, heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) - in response to the stressor. The prolactin response pattern did not differ between men and women, but there was some indication that women might have higher magnitude of response. Large individual differences regarding the magnitude of response were seen in general. The magnitude of the prolactin response was significantly related to the magnitude of the response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and, to some extent, the cardiovascular responses, indicating that individual differences in prolactin response in healthy men and women are dependent on the general physiological stress activation. In women, the magnitude of response was also related to estradiol level. CONCLUSION: Prolactin does increase in response to psychosocial stress, however, with large individual variation in magnitude of response. The pattern of prolactin response does not differ between men and women. However, there was some indication that women might have higher magnitude of increase than men, and that the magnitude of response in women was dependent on estradiol levels, and this needs to be further studied. SN - 1873-3360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21621331/Prolactin_in_response_to_acute_psychosocial_stress_in_healthy_men_and_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(11)00131-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -