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Milestones in Parkinson's disease--clinical and pathologic features.
Mov Disord. 2011 May; 26(6):1015-21.MD

Abstract

The identification of the widespread deposition of fibrillized α-synuclein in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease in 1997 has had a profound impact on how the disease is now conceptualized. The previous focus on the loss of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system, the concept of subcortical dementia, and the idea that Parkinson's disease was dominated by motor impairment have all given way to research assessing more diverse brain regions, clinical symptoms, and phenotypes. It is now recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in association with Lewy bodies. There are now several theories on how the disease develops and progresses currently being validated in a variety of studies, although many of these theories have yet to incorporate the phenotypic clinical and pathological changes associated with age. A particularly exciting new area of research involves the cell-to-cell transmission of pathogenic proteins. The recent consensus definition of Parkinson's disease dementia will allow its pathologic substrates to be determined. These advances have progressed to a stage where the preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease and its specific signs and symptoms are being predicted and tested clinically. Such strategies herald a future wave of preventive strategies for Parkinson's disease and its clinical symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroscience Research Australia and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21626546

Citation

Halliday, Glenda, et al. "Milestones in Parkinson's Disease--clinical and Pathologic Features." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 26, no. 6, 2011, pp. 1015-21.
Halliday G, Lees A, Stern M. Milestones in Parkinson's disease--clinical and pathologic features. Mov Disord. 2011;26(6):1015-21.
Halliday, G., Lees, A., & Stern, M. (2011). Milestones in Parkinson's disease--clinical and pathologic features. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 26(6), 1015-21. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.23669
Halliday G, Lees A, Stern M. Milestones in Parkinson's Disease--clinical and Pathologic Features. Mov Disord. 2011;26(6):1015-21. PubMed PMID: 21626546.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Milestones in Parkinson's disease--clinical and pathologic features. AU - Halliday,Glenda, AU - Lees,Andrew, AU - Stern,Matthew, PY - 2011/6/1/entrez PY - 2011/6/1/pubmed PY - 2011/10/1/medline SP - 1015 EP - 21 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov Disord VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - The identification of the widespread deposition of fibrillized α-synuclein in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease in 1997 has had a profound impact on how the disease is now conceptualized. The previous focus on the loss of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system, the concept of subcortical dementia, and the idea that Parkinson's disease was dominated by motor impairment have all given way to research assessing more diverse brain regions, clinical symptoms, and phenotypes. It is now recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in association with Lewy bodies. There are now several theories on how the disease develops and progresses currently being validated in a variety of studies, although many of these theories have yet to incorporate the phenotypic clinical and pathological changes associated with age. A particularly exciting new area of research involves the cell-to-cell transmission of pathogenic proteins. The recent consensus definition of Parkinson's disease dementia will allow its pathologic substrates to be determined. These advances have progressed to a stage where the preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease and its specific signs and symptoms are being predicted and tested clinically. Such strategies herald a future wave of preventive strategies for Parkinson's disease and its clinical symptoms. SN - 1531-8257 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21626546/Milestones_in_Parkinson's_disease__clinical_and_pathologic_features_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.23669 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -