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Cannabis use before age 15 and subsequent executive functioning.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many studies have suggested that adolescence is a period of particular vulnerability to neurocognitive effects associated with substance misuse. However, few large studies have measured differences in cognitive performance between chronic cannabis users who started in early adolescence (before age 15) with those who started later.

AIMS

To examine the executive functioning of individuals who started chronic cannabis use before age 15 compared with those who started chronic cannabis use after 15 and controls.

METHOD

We evaluated the performance of 104 chronic cannabis users (49 early-onset users and 55 late-onset users) and 44 controls who undertook neuropsychological tasks, with a focus on executive functioning. Comparisons involving neuropsychological measures were performed using generalised linear model analysis of variance (ANOVA).

RESULTS

The early-onset group showed significantly poorer performance compared with the controls and the late-onset group on tasks assessing sustained attention, impulse control and executive functioning.

CONCLUSIONS

Early-onset chronic cannabis users exhibited poorer cognitive performance than controls and late-onset users in executive functioning. Chronic cannabis use, when started before age 15, may have more deleterious effects on neurocognitive functioning.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas and Unidade de Pesquisas em Álcool e Drogas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. m.alice@plenamente.com.br

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    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adolescent Development
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Age of Onset
    Analysis of Variance
    Brain
    Cannabinoids
    Child
    Cognition Disorders
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Executive Function
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Marijuana Abuse
    Middle Aged
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21628706

    Citation

    Fontes, Maria Alice, et al. "Cannabis Use Before Age 15 and Subsequent Executive Functioning." The British Journal of Psychiatry : the Journal of Mental Science, vol. 198, no. 6, 2011, pp. 442-7.
    Fontes MA, Bolla KI, Cunha PJ, et al. Cannabis use before age 15 and subsequent executive functioning. Br J Psychiatry. 2011;198(6):442-7.
    Fontes, M. A., Bolla, K. I., Cunha, P. J., Almeida, P. P., Jungerman, F., Laranjeira, R. R., ... Lacerda, A. L. (2011). Cannabis use before age 15 and subsequent executive functioning. The British Journal of Psychiatry : the Journal of Mental Science, 198(6), pp. 442-7. doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.110.077479.
    Fontes MA, et al. Cannabis Use Before Age 15 and Subsequent Executive Functioning. Br J Psychiatry. 2011;198(6):442-7. PubMed PMID: 21628706.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabis use before age 15 and subsequent executive functioning. AU - Fontes,Maria Alice, AU - Bolla,Karen I, AU - Cunha,Paulo Jannuzzi, AU - Almeida,Priscila Previato, AU - Jungerman,Flávia, AU - Laranjeira,Ronaldo Ramos, AU - Bressan,Rodrigo A, AU - Lacerda,Acioly L T, PY - 2011/6/2/entrez PY - 2011/6/2/pubmed PY - 2011/9/14/medline SP - 442 EP - 7 JF - The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science JO - Br J Psychiatry VL - 198 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many studies have suggested that adolescence is a period of particular vulnerability to neurocognitive effects associated with substance misuse. However, few large studies have measured differences in cognitive performance between chronic cannabis users who started in early adolescence (before age 15) with those who started later. AIMS: To examine the executive functioning of individuals who started chronic cannabis use before age 15 compared with those who started chronic cannabis use after 15 and controls. METHOD: We evaluated the performance of 104 chronic cannabis users (49 early-onset users and 55 late-onset users) and 44 controls who undertook neuropsychological tasks, with a focus on executive functioning. Comparisons involving neuropsychological measures were performed using generalised linear model analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: The early-onset group showed significantly poorer performance compared with the controls and the late-onset group on tasks assessing sustained attention, impulse control and executive functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Early-onset chronic cannabis users exhibited poorer cognitive performance than controls and late-onset users in executive functioning. Chronic cannabis use, when started before age 15, may have more deleterious effects on neurocognitive functioning. SN - 1472-1465 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21628706/Cannabis_use_before_age_15_and_subsequent_executive_functioning_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007125000255414/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -