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Similarity in depressive symptoms in adolescents' friendship dyads: selection or socialization?
Dev Psychol. 2011 Nov; 47(6):1804-14.DP

Abstract

This study examined friendship selection and socialization as mechanisms explaining similarity in depressive symptoms in adolescent same-gender best friend dyads. The sample consisted of 1,752 adolescents (51% male) ages 12-16 years (M = 13.77, SD = 0.73) forming 487 friend dyads and 389 nonfriend dyads (the nonfriend dyads served as a comparison group). To test our hypothesis, we applied a multigroup actor-partner interdependence model to 3 friendship types that started and ended at different time points during the 2 waves of data collection. Results showed that adolescents reported levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up that were similar to those of their best friends. Socialization processes explained the increase in similarity exclusively in female dyads, whereas no evidence for friendship selection emerged for either male or female dyads. Additional analyses revealed that similarity between friends was particularly evident in the actual best friend dyads (i.e., true best friends), in which evidence for socialization processes emerged for both female and male friend dyads. Findings highlight the importance of examining friendship relations as a potential context for the development of depressive symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy. m.giletta@pwo.ru.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21639621

Citation

Giletta, Matteo, et al. "Similarity in Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents' Friendship Dyads: Selection or Socialization?" Developmental Psychology, vol. 47, no. 6, 2011, pp. 1804-14.
Giletta M, Scholte RH, Burk WJ, et al. Similarity in depressive symptoms in adolescents' friendship dyads: selection or socialization? Dev Psychol. 2011;47(6):1804-14.
Giletta, M., Scholte, R. H., Burk, W. J., Engels, R. C., Larsen, J. K., Prinstein, M. J., & Ciairano, S. (2011). Similarity in depressive symptoms in adolescents' friendship dyads: selection or socialization? Developmental Psychology, 47(6), 1804-14. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0023872
Giletta M, et al. Similarity in Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents' Friendship Dyads: Selection or Socialization. Dev Psychol. 2011;47(6):1804-14. PubMed PMID: 21639621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Similarity in depressive symptoms in adolescents' friendship dyads: selection or socialization? AU - Giletta,Matteo, AU - Scholte,Ron H J, AU - Burk,William J, AU - Engels,Rutger C M E, AU - Larsen,Junilla K, AU - Prinstein,Mitchell J, AU - Ciairano,Silvia, Y1 - 2011/05/30/ PY - 2011/6/7/entrez PY - 2011/6/7/pubmed PY - 2012/3/13/medline SP - 1804 EP - 14 JF - Developmental psychology JO - Dev Psychol VL - 47 IS - 6 N2 - This study examined friendship selection and socialization as mechanisms explaining similarity in depressive symptoms in adolescent same-gender best friend dyads. The sample consisted of 1,752 adolescents (51% male) ages 12-16 years (M = 13.77, SD = 0.73) forming 487 friend dyads and 389 nonfriend dyads (the nonfriend dyads served as a comparison group). To test our hypothesis, we applied a multigroup actor-partner interdependence model to 3 friendship types that started and ended at different time points during the 2 waves of data collection. Results showed that adolescents reported levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up that were similar to those of their best friends. Socialization processes explained the increase in similarity exclusively in female dyads, whereas no evidence for friendship selection emerged for either male or female dyads. Additional analyses revealed that similarity between friends was particularly evident in the actual best friend dyads (i.e., true best friends), in which evidence for socialization processes emerged for both female and male friend dyads. Findings highlight the importance of examining friendship relations as a potential context for the development of depressive symptoms. SN - 1939-0599 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21639621/Similarity_in_depressive_symptoms_in_adolescents'_friendship_dyads:_selection_or_socialization L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/dev/47/6/1804 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -