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Stability and relapse of maxillary anterior crowding treatment in class I and class II Division 1 malocclusions.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Jun; 139(6):768-74.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The maxillary anterior teeth are the most important to facial esthetics because they are the first to show on a smile. Therefore, stability of the maxillary anterior teeth alignment is an important issue. The objective of this study was to compare the stability of maxillary anterior tooth alignment in Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions.

METHODS

The sample comprised dental casts of 70 patients with Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions and a minimum of 3 mm of maxillary anterior crowding measured by an irregularity index. The patients were treated with extractions and evaluated at pretreatment and posttreatment and at least 5 years after treatment. The sample was divided into 3 groups: group 1, Class I malocclusion treated with 4 first premolar extractions comprising 30 subjects, with an initial age of 13.16 years and 8.59 mm of initial maxillary irregularity; group 2, Class II malocclusion treated with 4 first premolar extractions comprising 20 subjects, with an initial age of 12.95 years and 11.10 mm of maxillary irregularity; and group 3, Class II malocclusion treated with 2 first maxillary premolar extractions comprising 20 subjects, with an initial age of 13.09 years and 9.68 mm of maxillary irregularity.

RESULTS

The decrease in the maxillary irregularity index was significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 during treatment. The stability of maxillary anterior alignment was 88.12% over the long term; 77% of the linear displacement of the anatomic contact points tended to return to their original positions.

CONCLUSIONS

Stability of maxillary anterior alignment between the 3 groups was similar. The stability of maxillary anterior alignment was high over the long term, but a high percentage of teeth tended to return to their original positions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthodontics, Bauru Dental School, University of São Paulo, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil. cquaglio@yahoo.com.br.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21640883

Citation

Quaglio, Camila Leite, et al. "Stability and Relapse of Maxillary Anterior Crowding Treatment in Class I and Class II Division 1 Malocclusions." American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, vol. 139, no. 6, 2011, pp. 768-74.
Quaglio CL, de Freitas KM, de Freitas MR, et al. Stability and relapse of maxillary anterior crowding treatment in class I and class II Division 1 malocclusions. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011;139(6):768-74.
Quaglio, C. L., de Freitas, K. M., de Freitas, M. R., Janson, G., & Henriques, J. F. (2011). Stability and relapse of maxillary anterior crowding treatment in class I and class II Division 1 malocclusions. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, 139(6), 768-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2009.10.044
Quaglio CL, et al. Stability and Relapse of Maxillary Anterior Crowding Treatment in Class I and Class II Division 1 Malocclusions. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011;139(6):768-74. PubMed PMID: 21640883.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stability and relapse of maxillary anterior crowding treatment in class I and class II Division 1 malocclusions. AU - Quaglio,Camila Leite, AU - de Freitas,Karina Maria Salvatore, AU - de Freitas,Marcos Roberto, AU - Janson,Guilherme, AU - Henriques,José Fernando Castanha, PY - 2009/04/01/received PY - 2009/10/01/revised PY - 2009/10/01/accepted PY - 2011/6/7/entrez PY - 2011/6/7/pubmed PY - 2011/8/13/medline SP - 768 EP - 74 JF - American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics JO - Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop VL - 139 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The maxillary anterior teeth are the most important to facial esthetics because they are the first to show on a smile. Therefore, stability of the maxillary anterior teeth alignment is an important issue. The objective of this study was to compare the stability of maxillary anterior tooth alignment in Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions. METHODS: The sample comprised dental casts of 70 patients with Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions and a minimum of 3 mm of maxillary anterior crowding measured by an irregularity index. The patients were treated with extractions and evaluated at pretreatment and posttreatment and at least 5 years after treatment. The sample was divided into 3 groups: group 1, Class I malocclusion treated with 4 first premolar extractions comprising 30 subjects, with an initial age of 13.16 years and 8.59 mm of initial maxillary irregularity; group 2, Class II malocclusion treated with 4 first premolar extractions comprising 20 subjects, with an initial age of 12.95 years and 11.10 mm of maxillary irregularity; and group 3, Class II malocclusion treated with 2 first maxillary premolar extractions comprising 20 subjects, with an initial age of 13.09 years and 9.68 mm of maxillary irregularity. RESULTS: The decrease in the maxillary irregularity index was significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 during treatment. The stability of maxillary anterior alignment was 88.12% over the long term; 77% of the linear displacement of the anatomic contact points tended to return to their original positions. CONCLUSIONS: Stability of maxillary anterior alignment between the 3 groups was similar. The stability of maxillary anterior alignment was high over the long term, but a high percentage of teeth tended to return to their original positions. SN - 1097-6752 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21640883/Stability_and_relapse_of_maxillary_anterior_crowding_treatment_in_class_I_and_class_II_Division_1_malocclusions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-5406(11)00254-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -