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Attentional processes in children with ADHD: an event-related potential study using the attention network test.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2011 Aug; 81(2):82-90.IJ

Abstract

A variety of event-related potential (ERP) based studies have shown differences in neuronal processes underlying attention, inhibition and error processing in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared to controls. However, so far there are no studies that have compared children with ADHD and typically developing (TD) children regarding effects in ERP components associated with the attention network test (ANT). The ANT allows to differentiate between three particular aspects of attention: alerting, orienting, conflict. Twenty-five children with ADHD and 19 TD children (comparable with respect to age, sex, and IQ) performed the ANT while ERPs were recorded. Based on DSM-IV, the group of children with ADHD was divided in an inattentive (ADHDin, n=10) and a combined (ADHDcom, n=15) subgroup. On the performance level, the ADHD group showed a significantly higher variability of reaction times. Concerning ERP measures, smaller cue-P3 amplitudes were found in the ADHD group indicating that children with ADHD allocate less attentional resources for cue processing. In addition, the target-P3 in ADHD showed smaller amplitudes. Subgroup analysis revealed reduced cue-P3 amplitudes in both subgroups and reduced target-P3 amplitudes in ADHDin compared to TD children. Except for a higher alerting score in ADHD after correction for cue-P3 group differences, performance data revealed no group differences specific for the three attention networks. No group differences related to the attention networks were observed at the ERP level. Our results suggest that deviant attentional processing in children with ADHD is only partly related to ANT-specific effects. Findings are compatible with the model of a suboptimal energetic state regulation in ADHD. Furthermore, our results suggest that deviant cue processing in ADHD and related differences in task modulations should be accounted for in data analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child & Adolescent Mental Health, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. oliver.kratz@uk-erlangen.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21641942

Citation

Kratz, Oliver, et al. "Attentional Processes in Children With ADHD: an Event-related Potential Study Using the Attention Network Test." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 81, no. 2, 2011, pp. 82-90.
Kratz O, Studer P, Malcherek S, et al. Attentional processes in children with ADHD: an event-related potential study using the attention network test. Int J Psychophysiol. 2011;81(2):82-90.
Kratz, O., Studer, P., Malcherek, S., Erbe, K., Moll, G. H., & Heinrich, H. (2011). Attentional processes in children with ADHD: an event-related potential study using the attention network test. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 81(2), 82-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2011.05.008
Kratz O, et al. Attentional Processes in Children With ADHD: an Event-related Potential Study Using the Attention Network Test. Int J Psychophysiol. 2011;81(2):82-90. PubMed PMID: 21641942.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attentional processes in children with ADHD: an event-related potential study using the attention network test. AU - Kratz,Oliver, AU - Studer,Petra, AU - Malcherek,Susanne, AU - Erbe,Karlheinz, AU - Moll,Gunther H, AU - Heinrich,Hartmut, Y1 - 2011/06/12/ PY - 2010/10/29/received PY - 2011/05/13/revised PY - 2011/05/22/accepted PY - 2011/6/7/entrez PY - 2011/6/7/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 82 EP - 90 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 81 IS - 2 N2 - A variety of event-related potential (ERP) based studies have shown differences in neuronal processes underlying attention, inhibition and error processing in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared to controls. However, so far there are no studies that have compared children with ADHD and typically developing (TD) children regarding effects in ERP components associated with the attention network test (ANT). The ANT allows to differentiate between three particular aspects of attention: alerting, orienting, conflict. Twenty-five children with ADHD and 19 TD children (comparable with respect to age, sex, and IQ) performed the ANT while ERPs were recorded. Based on DSM-IV, the group of children with ADHD was divided in an inattentive (ADHDin, n=10) and a combined (ADHDcom, n=15) subgroup. On the performance level, the ADHD group showed a significantly higher variability of reaction times. Concerning ERP measures, smaller cue-P3 amplitudes were found in the ADHD group indicating that children with ADHD allocate less attentional resources for cue processing. In addition, the target-P3 in ADHD showed smaller amplitudes. Subgroup analysis revealed reduced cue-P3 amplitudes in both subgroups and reduced target-P3 amplitudes in ADHDin compared to TD children. Except for a higher alerting score in ADHD after correction for cue-P3 group differences, performance data revealed no group differences specific for the three attention networks. No group differences related to the attention networks were observed at the ERP level. Our results suggest that deviant attentional processing in children with ADHD is only partly related to ANT-specific effects. Findings are compatible with the model of a suboptimal energetic state regulation in ADHD. Furthermore, our results suggest that deviant cue processing in ADHD and related differences in task modulations should be accounted for in data analysis. SN - 1872-7697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21641942/Attentional_processes_in_children_with_ADHD:_an_event_related_potential_study_using_the_attention_network_test_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(11)00170-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -