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Ultraviolet B and incidence rates of leukemia worldwide.
Am J Prev Med. 2011 Jul; 41(1):68-74.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent research has suggested a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and risk of leukemia.

PURPOSE

Using data from the UN cancer database, GLOBOCAN, this study will determine whether a relationship exists for latitude and ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance with incidence rates of leukemia in 175 countries.

METHODS

Multiple regression was used to analyze the independent association between UVB and age-adjusted incidence rates of leukemia in 139 countries in 2002. This study controlled for dietary data on intake of energy from animal sources and per capita healthcare expenditures. The analyses were performed in 2009.

RESULTS

People residing in the highest-latitude countries had the highest rates of leukemia in both men (R(2)=0.34, p<0.0001) and women (R(2)=0.24, p<0.0001). In men, UVB was independently inversely associated with leukemia incidence rates (p≤0.001), whereas animal energy consumption (p=0.02) and per capita healthcare expenditures (p≤0.0001) were independently positively associated (R(2) for model=0.61, p≤0.0001). In women, UVB adjusted for cloud cover was independently inversely associated with leukemia incidence rates (p≤0.01), whereas animal energy consumption (p≤0.05) and per capita healthcare expenditures (p=0.0002) were independently positively associated (R(2) for model=0.51, p<0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Countries with low UVB had higher age-adjusted incidence rates of leukemia. This suggests the possibility that low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status, because of lower levels of UVB, somehow might predict the development of leukemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, 92093-0631, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21665065

Citation

Mohr, Sharif B., et al. "Ultraviolet B and Incidence Rates of Leukemia Worldwide." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 41, no. 1, 2011, pp. 68-74.
Mohr SB, Garland CF, Gorham ED, et al. Ultraviolet B and incidence rates of leukemia worldwide. Am J Prev Med. 2011;41(1):68-74.
Mohr, S. B., Garland, C. F., Gorham, E. D., Grant, W. B., & Garland, F. C. (2011). Ultraviolet B and incidence rates of leukemia worldwide. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 41(1), 68-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2011.04.003
Mohr SB, et al. Ultraviolet B and Incidence Rates of Leukemia Worldwide. Am J Prev Med. 2011;41(1):68-74. PubMed PMID: 21665065.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ultraviolet B and incidence rates of leukemia worldwide. AU - Mohr,Sharif B, AU - Garland,Cedric F, AU - Gorham,Edward D, AU - Grant,William B, AU - Garland,Frank C, PY - 2010/10/06/received PY - 2011/04/08/revised PY - 2011/04/12/accepted PY - 2011/6/14/entrez PY - 2011/6/15/pubmed PY - 2011/10/14/medline SP - 68 EP - 74 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 41 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent research has suggested a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and risk of leukemia. PURPOSE: Using data from the UN cancer database, GLOBOCAN, this study will determine whether a relationship exists for latitude and ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance with incidence rates of leukemia in 175 countries. METHODS: Multiple regression was used to analyze the independent association between UVB and age-adjusted incidence rates of leukemia in 139 countries in 2002. This study controlled for dietary data on intake of energy from animal sources and per capita healthcare expenditures. The analyses were performed in 2009. RESULTS: People residing in the highest-latitude countries had the highest rates of leukemia in both men (R(2)=0.34, p<0.0001) and women (R(2)=0.24, p<0.0001). In men, UVB was independently inversely associated with leukemia incidence rates (p≤0.001), whereas animal energy consumption (p=0.02) and per capita healthcare expenditures (p≤0.0001) were independently positively associated (R(2) for model=0.61, p≤0.0001). In women, UVB adjusted for cloud cover was independently inversely associated with leukemia incidence rates (p≤0.01), whereas animal energy consumption (p≤0.05) and per capita healthcare expenditures (p=0.0002) were independently positively associated (R(2) for model=0.51, p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Countries with low UVB had higher age-adjusted incidence rates of leukemia. This suggests the possibility that low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status, because of lower levels of UVB, somehow might predict the development of leukemia. SN - 1873-2607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21665065/Ultraviolet_B_and_incidence_rates_of_leukemia_worldwide_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(11)00259-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -