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On the (un)conditionality of automatic attitude activation: the valence proportion effect.
Can J Exp Psychol. 2011 Jun; 65(2):125-32.CJ

Abstract

Affective priming studies have shown that participants are faster to pronounce affectively polarized target words that are preceded by affectively congruent prime words than affectively polarized target words that are preceded by affectively incongruent prime words. We examined whether affective priming of naming responses depends on the valence proportion (i.e., the proportion of stimuli that are affectively polarized). In one group of participants, experimental trials were embedded in a context of filler trials that consisted of affectively polarized stimulus materials (i.e., high valence proportion condition). In a second group, the same set of experimental trials was embedded in a context of filler trials consisting of neutral stimuli (i.e., low valence proportion condition). Results showed that affective priming of naming responses was significantly stronger in the high valence proportion condition than in the low valence proportion condition. We conclude that (a) subtle aspects of the procedure can influence affective priming of naming responses, (b) finding affective priming of naming responses does not allow for the conclusion that affective stimulus processing is unconditional, and (c) affective stimulus processing depends on selective attention for affective stimulus information.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Ghent University, Belgium. tom.everaert@ugent.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21668095

Citation

Everaert, Tom, et al. "On the (un)conditionality of Automatic Attitude Activation: the Valence Proportion Effect." Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology = Revue Canadienne De Psychologie Experimentale, vol. 65, no. 2, 2011, pp. 125-32.
Everaert T, Spruyt A, De Houwer J. On the (un)conditionality of automatic attitude activation: the valence proportion effect. Can J Exp Psychol. 2011;65(2):125-32.
Everaert, T., Spruyt, A., & De Houwer, J. (2011). On the (un)conditionality of automatic attitude activation: the valence proportion effect. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology = Revue Canadienne De Psychologie Experimentale, 65(2), 125-32. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0022316
Everaert T, Spruyt A, De Houwer J. On the (un)conditionality of Automatic Attitude Activation: the Valence Proportion Effect. Can J Exp Psychol. 2011;65(2):125-32. PubMed PMID: 21668095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - On the (un)conditionality of automatic attitude activation: the valence proportion effect. AU - Everaert,Tom, AU - Spruyt,Adriaan, AU - De Houwer,Jan, PY - 2011/6/15/entrez PY - 2011/6/15/pubmed PY - 2011/10/26/medline SP - 125 EP - 32 JF - Canadian journal of experimental psychology = Revue canadienne de psychologie experimentale JO - Can J Exp Psychol VL - 65 IS - 2 N2 - Affective priming studies have shown that participants are faster to pronounce affectively polarized target words that are preceded by affectively congruent prime words than affectively polarized target words that are preceded by affectively incongruent prime words. We examined whether affective priming of naming responses depends on the valence proportion (i.e., the proportion of stimuli that are affectively polarized). In one group of participants, experimental trials were embedded in a context of filler trials that consisted of affectively polarized stimulus materials (i.e., high valence proportion condition). In a second group, the same set of experimental trials was embedded in a context of filler trials consisting of neutral stimuli (i.e., low valence proportion condition). Results showed that affective priming of naming responses was significantly stronger in the high valence proportion condition than in the low valence proportion condition. We conclude that (a) subtle aspects of the procedure can influence affective priming of naming responses, (b) finding affective priming of naming responses does not allow for the conclusion that affective stimulus processing is unconditional, and (c) affective stimulus processing depends on selective attention for affective stimulus information. SN - 1878-7290 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21668095/On_the__un_conditionality_of_automatic_attitude_activation:_the_valence_proportion_effect_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/cep/65/2/125 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -