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Fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid consumption and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Chinese men and women.
Am J Clin Nutr 2011; 94(2):543-51AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids, found mainly in fish, have been postulated to reduce type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. However, the role of long-chain n-3 fatty acids and fish intake in the development of T2D remains unresolved.

OBJECTIVE

We examined associations between fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acids and the risk of T2D in a middle-aged Chinese population.

DESIGN

This was a prospective population-based cohort study in 51,963 men and 64,193 women free of T2D, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline with valid dietary information. Dietary intake, physical activity, and anthropometric measurements were collected. A Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association of fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid (in g/d) with risk of T2D.

RESULTS

Fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid intakes were inversely associated with T2D in women. The relative risks [RRs (95% CI)] for quintiles of fish intake were 1.00, 0.96 (0.86, 1.06), 0.84 (0.75, 0.94), 0.80 (0.71, 0.90), and 0.89 (0.78, 1.01) (P for trend = 0.003) and for shellfish were 1.00, 0.91 (0.82, 1.01), 0.79 (0.71, 0.89), 0.80 (0.71, 0.91), and 0.86 (0.76, 0.99) (P for trend = 0.006). In men, only the association between shellfish intake and T2D was significant. The RRs (95% CI) for quintiles of fish intake were 1.00, 0.92 (0.75, 1.13), 0.80 (0.65, 1.00), 0.89 (0.72, 1.11), and 0.94 (0.74, 1.17) (P for trend = 0.50) and for shellfish intake were 1.00, 0.93 (0.76, 1.12), 0.70 (0.56, 086), 0.66 (0.53, 0.82), and 0.82 (0.65, 1.02) (P for trend = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS

An inverse association between fish and shellfish intake and T2D in women was found. No evidence of a detrimental effect of fish intake in this population was observed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. raquel.villegas@vanderbilt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21677058

Citation

Villegas, Raquel, et al. "Fish, Shellfish, and Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acid Consumption and Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-aged Chinese Men and Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 94, no. 2, 2011, pp. 543-51.
Villegas R, Xiang YB, Elasy T, et al. Fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid consumption and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Chinese men and women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;94(2):543-51.
Villegas, R., Xiang, Y. B., Elasy, T., Li, H. L., Yang, G., Cai, H., ... Shu, X. O. (2011). Fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid consumption and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Chinese men and women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 94(2), pp. 543-51. doi:10.3945/ajcn.111.013193.
Villegas R, et al. Fish, Shellfish, and Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acid Consumption and Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-aged Chinese Men and Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;94(2):543-51. PubMed PMID: 21677058.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid consumption and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Chinese men and women. AU - Villegas,Raquel, AU - Xiang,Yong-Bing, AU - Elasy,Tom, AU - Li,Hong-Lan, AU - Yang,Gong, AU - Cai,Hui, AU - Ye,Fei, AU - Gao,Yu-Tang, AU - Shyr,Yu, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, Y1 - 2011/06/15/ PY - 2011/6/17/entrez PY - 2011/6/17/pubmed PY - 2011/9/29/medline SP - 543 EP - 51 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 94 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids, found mainly in fish, have been postulated to reduce type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. However, the role of long-chain n-3 fatty acids and fish intake in the development of T2D remains unresolved. OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acids and the risk of T2D in a middle-aged Chinese population. DESIGN: This was a prospective population-based cohort study in 51,963 men and 64,193 women free of T2D, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline with valid dietary information. Dietary intake, physical activity, and anthropometric measurements were collected. A Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association of fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid (in g/d) with risk of T2D. RESULTS: Fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acid intakes were inversely associated with T2D in women. The relative risks [RRs (95% CI)] for quintiles of fish intake were 1.00, 0.96 (0.86, 1.06), 0.84 (0.75, 0.94), 0.80 (0.71, 0.90), and 0.89 (0.78, 1.01) (P for trend = 0.003) and for shellfish were 1.00, 0.91 (0.82, 1.01), 0.79 (0.71, 0.89), 0.80 (0.71, 0.91), and 0.86 (0.76, 0.99) (P for trend = 0.006). In men, only the association between shellfish intake and T2D was significant. The RRs (95% CI) for quintiles of fish intake were 1.00, 0.92 (0.75, 1.13), 0.80 (0.65, 1.00), 0.89 (0.72, 1.11), and 0.94 (0.74, 1.17) (P for trend = 0.50) and for shellfish intake were 1.00, 0.93 (0.76, 1.12), 0.70 (0.56, 086), 0.66 (0.53, 0.82), and 0.82 (0.65, 1.02) (P for trend = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: An inverse association between fish and shellfish intake and T2D in women was found. No evidence of a detrimental effect of fish intake in this population was observed. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21677058/Fish_shellfish_and_long_chain_n_3_fatty_acid_consumption_and_risk_of_incident_type_2_diabetes_in_middle_aged_Chinese_men_and_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.111.013193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -