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Infant and young child feeding in the Peruvian Amazon: the need to promote exclusive breastfeeding and nutrient-dense traditional complementary foods.
Matern Child Nutr. 2011 Jul; 7(3):284-94.MC

Abstract

The study objective was to understand the role of traditional Awajún foods in dietary quality and the potential impacts on growth of Awajún infants and young children 0-23 months of age. Research took place in April and May of 2004, along the Cenepa River in six Awajún communities. Anthropometry estimated nutritional status for 32 infants (0-23 months). Repeat dietary recalls and infant feeding histories were completed with 32 mothers. Adequacy of the complementary foods was compared with World Health Organization guidelines. Anthropometry indicated a high prevalence of stunting (39.4% of infants and young children), with nutritional status declining with age. Half of the Awajún mothers practised exclusive breastfeeding. Dietary recalls and infant food histories suggested that many of the infants were getting adequate nutrition from complementary foods and breastfeeding; however, there was variation in breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices among the mothers. Complementary feeding for young children 12-23 months generally met nutrient recommendations, but mean intakes for iron, zinc, calcium and vitamin A were inadequate in infants 6-11 months. Traditional foods provided 85% of energy and were more nutrient dense than market foods. Appropriate infant and complementary feeding was found among some women; however, given the range of feeding practices and introduction of market foods, health promotion targeting infant and young child feeding is warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore Rd., Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21689271

Citation

Roche, Marion L., et al. "Infant and Young Child Feeding in the Peruvian Amazon: the Need to Promote Exclusive Breastfeeding and Nutrient-dense Traditional Complementary Foods." Maternal & Child Nutrition, vol. 7, no. 3, 2011, pp. 284-94.
Roche ML, Creed-Kanashiro HM, Tuesta I, et al. Infant and young child feeding in the Peruvian Amazon: the need to promote exclusive breastfeeding and nutrient-dense traditional complementary foods. Matern Child Nutr. 2011;7(3):284-94.
Roche, M. L., Creed-Kanashiro, H. M., Tuesta, I., & Kuhnlein, H. V. (2011). Infant and young child feeding in the Peruvian Amazon: the need to promote exclusive breastfeeding and nutrient-dense traditional complementary foods. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 7(3), 284-94. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-8709.2009.00234.x
Roche ML, et al. Infant and Young Child Feeding in the Peruvian Amazon: the Need to Promote Exclusive Breastfeeding and Nutrient-dense Traditional Complementary Foods. Matern Child Nutr. 2011;7(3):284-94. PubMed PMID: 21689271.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infant and young child feeding in the Peruvian Amazon: the need to promote exclusive breastfeeding and nutrient-dense traditional complementary foods. AU - Roche,Marion L, AU - Creed-Kanashiro,Hilary M, AU - Tuesta,Irma, AU - Kuhnlein,Harriet V, Y1 - 2010/01/21/ PY - 2011/6/22/entrez PY - 2011/6/22/pubmed PY - 2011/10/28/medline SP - 284 EP - 94 JF - Maternal & child nutrition JO - Matern Child Nutr VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - The study objective was to understand the role of traditional Awajún foods in dietary quality and the potential impacts on growth of Awajún infants and young children 0-23 months of age. Research took place in April and May of 2004, along the Cenepa River in six Awajún communities. Anthropometry estimated nutritional status for 32 infants (0-23 months). Repeat dietary recalls and infant feeding histories were completed with 32 mothers. Adequacy of the complementary foods was compared with World Health Organization guidelines. Anthropometry indicated a high prevalence of stunting (39.4% of infants and young children), with nutritional status declining with age. Half of the Awajún mothers practised exclusive breastfeeding. Dietary recalls and infant food histories suggested that many of the infants were getting adequate nutrition from complementary foods and breastfeeding; however, there was variation in breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices among the mothers. Complementary feeding for young children 12-23 months generally met nutrient recommendations, but mean intakes for iron, zinc, calcium and vitamin A were inadequate in infants 6-11 months. Traditional foods provided 85% of energy and were more nutrient dense than market foods. Appropriate infant and complementary feeding was found among some women; however, given the range of feeding practices and introduction of market foods, health promotion targeting infant and young child feeding is warranted. SN - 1740-8709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21689271/Infant_and_young_child_feeding_in_the_Peruvian_Amazon:_the_need_to_promote_exclusive_breastfeeding_and_nutrient_dense_traditional_complementary_foods_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-8709.2009.00234.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -