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Physical fitness as a protective factor for cognitive impairment in a prospective population-based study in Germany.
J Alzheimers Dis 2011; 26(4):709-18JA

Abstract

To evaluate the predictive effects of subjective measures of physical activity (PA) and objective measures of physical fitness (PF) on dementia risk, Participants of the prospective population-based ILSE-study (*1930-1932; 12-year follow-up) were examined at three examination waves (t1 : 1993/94; t2 : 1997/98; t3 : 2005/07). 381 subjects of the original cohort (n = 500) were re-examined at t3. 29% of the subjects who were cognitively healthy at baseline received the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 7% of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subjects were screened for physical and mental health using medical interviews, physical, and neuropsychological examinations. Participants completed a questionnaire on their current and past PA at t1. Subjects were classified as physically active if they reported a regular sport activity for at least 2 hours per week in the past year. Muscular strength (handgrip) and motor coordination (balance) served as objective indicators of PF. Subjects who passed the balance-test at t1 had a reduced risk of developing MCI/AD at t3 (OR = 0.35, 95%CI 0.19-0.66, p < 0.01) and performed significantly better on various neuropsychological measures. Muscular strength or subjective reports of PA did not predict MCI/AD development. Our results confirm the hypothesis that PF acts as a protective factor for the development of cognitive disorders. In our study, context, motor coordination served as a better predictor than muscular strength or self-rated PA. Since subjects with cognitive disorders due to cerebral and/or systemic disorders were excluded from the analyses, our findings suggest that the effect of skill-related PF extends beyond the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21694450

Citation

Sattler, Christine, et al. "Physical Fitness as a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in a Prospective Population-based Study in Germany." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 26, no. 4, 2011, pp. 709-18.
Sattler C, Erickson KI, Toro P, et al. Physical fitness as a protective factor for cognitive impairment in a prospective population-based study in Germany. J Alzheimers Dis. 2011;26(4):709-18.
Sattler, C., Erickson, K. I., Toro, P., & Schröder, J. (2011). Physical fitness as a protective factor for cognitive impairment in a prospective population-based study in Germany. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 26(4), pp. 709-18. doi:10.3233/JAD-2011-110548.
Sattler C, et al. Physical Fitness as a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in a Prospective Population-based Study in Germany. J Alzheimers Dis. 2011;26(4):709-18. PubMed PMID: 21694450.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical fitness as a protective factor for cognitive impairment in a prospective population-based study in Germany. AU - Sattler,Christine, AU - Erickson,Kirk I, AU - Toro,Pablo, AU - Schröder,Johannes, PY - 2011/6/23/entrez PY - 2011/6/23/pubmed PY - 2012/1/27/medline SP - 709 EP - 18 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - To evaluate the predictive effects of subjective measures of physical activity (PA) and objective measures of physical fitness (PF) on dementia risk, Participants of the prospective population-based ILSE-study (*1930-1932; 12-year follow-up) were examined at three examination waves (t1 : 1993/94; t2 : 1997/98; t3 : 2005/07). 381 subjects of the original cohort (n = 500) were re-examined at t3. 29% of the subjects who were cognitively healthy at baseline received the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 7% of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subjects were screened for physical and mental health using medical interviews, physical, and neuropsychological examinations. Participants completed a questionnaire on their current and past PA at t1. Subjects were classified as physically active if they reported a regular sport activity for at least 2 hours per week in the past year. Muscular strength (handgrip) and motor coordination (balance) served as objective indicators of PF. Subjects who passed the balance-test at t1 had a reduced risk of developing MCI/AD at t3 (OR = 0.35, 95%CI 0.19-0.66, p < 0.01) and performed significantly better on various neuropsychological measures. Muscular strength or subjective reports of PA did not predict MCI/AD development. Our results confirm the hypothesis that PF acts as a protective factor for the development of cognitive disorders. In our study, context, motor coordination served as a better predictor than muscular strength or self-rated PA. Since subjects with cognitive disorders due to cerebral and/or systemic disorders were excluded from the analyses, our findings suggest that the effect of skill-related PF extends beyond the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21694450/Physical_fitness_as_a_protective_factor_for_cognitive_impairment_in_a_prospective_population_based_study_in_Germany_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&amp;id=doi:10.3233/JAD-2011-110548 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -