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Dietary intake of fruit and vegetables and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Few studies have evaluated the potential association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) by histologic subtype, and the results of these studies have been inconsistent.

METHODS

A detailed history of dietary practices and food preferences was collected using a food frequency questionnaire from 348 cases and 470 controls in a population-based, case-control study conducted in Nebraska during 1999-2002. Risk for the highest versus lowest quartile or tertile of intake was estimated by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs).

RESULTS

A lower risk of overall NHL was associated with a high intake of green leafy vegetables (OR = 0.6; CI = 0.3-1.0) and cruciferous vegetables (OR = 0.7; CI = 0.4-1.0). Analysis by subtype showed that green leafy vegetable intake was associated with a lower risk of follicular lymphoma (OR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-0.8) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (OR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-0.9), while consumption of cruciferous vegetables was associated with a lower risk of DLBCL (OR = 0.4; CI = 0.2-0.8). No association was found with intake of total vegetables, carotene-rich vegetables, or all fruit. For nutrients, the risk of NHL overall was inversely associated with a higher intake of β-cryptoxanthin (OR = 0.6; CI = 0.4-0.9), magnesium (OR = 0.4; CI = 0.2-0.6), potassium (OR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-1.0), and fiber (OR = 0.6; CI = 0.3-1.0), but positively associated with a higher intake of retinol (OR = 1.7; CI = 1.1-2.8). Intakes of vitamin E, magnesium, and potassium were inversely associated with the risk of DLBCL.

CONCLUSION

A higher intake of green leafy vegetables and cruciferous vegetables is associated with a lower risk of NHL overall, particularly follicular lymphoma and DLBCL.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Health Studies, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2007, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. bchiu@uchicago.edu

    , , , ,

    Source

    Cancer causes & control : CCC 22:8 2011 Aug pg 1183-95

    MeSH

    Case-Control Studies
    Diet
    Female
    Fruit
    Humans
    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Nebraska
    Risk Factors
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21695384

    Citation

    Chiu, Brian C-H, et al. "Dietary Intake of Fruit and Vegetables and Risk of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 22, no. 8, 2011, pp. 1183-95.
    Chiu BC, Kwon S, Evens AM, et al. Dietary intake of fruit and vegetables and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Cancer Causes Control. 2011;22(8):1183-95.
    Chiu, B. C., Kwon, S., Evens, A. M., Surawicz, T., Smith, S. M., & Weisenburger, D. D. (2011). Dietary intake of fruit and vegetables and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 22(8), pp. 1183-95. doi:10.1007/s10552-011-9797-5.
    Chiu BC, et al. Dietary Intake of Fruit and Vegetables and Risk of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. Cancer Causes Control. 2011;22(8):1183-95. PubMed PMID: 21695384.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intake of fruit and vegetables and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. AU - Chiu,Brian C-H, AU - Kwon,Soyang, AU - Evens,Andrew M, AU - Surawicz,Tanya, AU - Smith,Sonali M, AU - Weisenburger,Dennis D, Y1 - 2011/06/22/ PY - 2010/12/20/received PY - 2011/06/09/accepted PY - 2011/6/23/entrez PY - 2011/6/23/pubmed PY - 2011/12/30/medline SP - 1183 EP - 95 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 22 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Few studies have evaluated the potential association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) by histologic subtype, and the results of these studies have been inconsistent. METHODS: A detailed history of dietary practices and food preferences was collected using a food frequency questionnaire from 348 cases and 470 controls in a population-based, case-control study conducted in Nebraska during 1999-2002. Risk for the highest versus lowest quartile or tertile of intake was estimated by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs). RESULTS: A lower risk of overall NHL was associated with a high intake of green leafy vegetables (OR = 0.6; CI = 0.3-1.0) and cruciferous vegetables (OR = 0.7; CI = 0.4-1.0). Analysis by subtype showed that green leafy vegetable intake was associated with a lower risk of follicular lymphoma (OR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-0.8) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (OR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-0.9), while consumption of cruciferous vegetables was associated with a lower risk of DLBCL (OR = 0.4; CI = 0.2-0.8). No association was found with intake of total vegetables, carotene-rich vegetables, or all fruit. For nutrients, the risk of NHL overall was inversely associated with a higher intake of β-cryptoxanthin (OR = 0.6; CI = 0.4-0.9), magnesium (OR = 0.4; CI = 0.2-0.6), potassium (OR = 0.5; CI = 0.3-1.0), and fiber (OR = 0.6; CI = 0.3-1.0), but positively associated with a higher intake of retinol (OR = 1.7; CI = 1.1-2.8). Intakes of vitamin E, magnesium, and potassium were inversely associated with the risk of DLBCL. CONCLUSION: A higher intake of green leafy vegetables and cruciferous vegetables is associated with a lower risk of NHL overall, particularly follicular lymphoma and DLBCL. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21695384/Dietary_intake_of_fruit_and_vegetables_and_risk_of_non_Hodgkin_lymphoma_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-011-9797-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -