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Effects of acute alcohol consumption on alcohol-related cognitive biases in light and heavy drinkers are task-dependent.
J Psychopharmacol. 2012 Feb; 26(2):245-53.JP

Abstract

We investigated (1) the effects of alcohol on cognitive biases for alcohol-related cues, (2) the effects of drinking status on alcohol-related cognitive biases and (3) the similarity of any effects of alcohol across two measures of alcohol cognitive bias. Healthy, heavy and light social alcohol users (n = 72) were examined in a single-blind placebo-controlled design. Participants received 0.00 g/kg, 0.13 g/kg or 0.40 g/kg of alcohol in a between-subjects design and then completed both a modified Stroop task and a visual probe task. Modified Stroop data indicated a main effect of cue type, which was qualified by drinking status, with heavier drinkers slower to respond to alcohol-related cues. Visual probe data, in contrast, indicated a significant interaction effect between validity (valid: alcohol-related, invalid: neutral) and drink condition. Participants receiving a moderate dose of alcohol (0.40 g/kg) were faster to respond to alcohol-related stimuli compared with participants receiving a low dose of alcohol or placebo. These data indicate that the cognitive processes assayed by the visual probe and Stroop tasks may not be mediated by a common underlying mechanism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. sally.adams@bristol.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21708838

Citation

Adams, Sally, et al. "Effects of Acute Alcohol Consumption On Alcohol-related Cognitive Biases in Light and Heavy Drinkers Are Task-dependent." Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), vol. 26, no. 2, 2012, pp. 245-53.
Adams S, Ataya AF, Attwood AS, et al. Effects of acute alcohol consumption on alcohol-related cognitive biases in light and heavy drinkers are task-dependent. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2012;26(2):245-53.
Adams, S., Ataya, A. F., Attwood, A. S., & Munafò, M. R. (2012). Effects of acute alcohol consumption on alcohol-related cognitive biases in light and heavy drinkers are task-dependent. Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), 26(2), 245-53. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881111405355
Adams S, et al. Effects of Acute Alcohol Consumption On Alcohol-related Cognitive Biases in Light and Heavy Drinkers Are Task-dependent. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2012;26(2):245-53. PubMed PMID: 21708838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of acute alcohol consumption on alcohol-related cognitive biases in light and heavy drinkers are task-dependent. AU - Adams,Sally, AU - Ataya,Alia F, AU - Attwood,Angela S, AU - Munafò,Marcus R, Y1 - 2011/06/27/ PY - 2011/6/29/entrez PY - 2011/6/29/pubmed PY - 2012/8/22/medline SP - 245 EP - 53 JF - Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England) JO - J. Psychopharmacol. (Oxford) VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - We investigated (1) the effects of alcohol on cognitive biases for alcohol-related cues, (2) the effects of drinking status on alcohol-related cognitive biases and (3) the similarity of any effects of alcohol across two measures of alcohol cognitive bias. Healthy, heavy and light social alcohol users (n = 72) were examined in a single-blind placebo-controlled design. Participants received 0.00 g/kg, 0.13 g/kg or 0.40 g/kg of alcohol in a between-subjects design and then completed both a modified Stroop task and a visual probe task. Modified Stroop data indicated a main effect of cue type, which was qualified by drinking status, with heavier drinkers slower to respond to alcohol-related cues. Visual probe data, in contrast, indicated a significant interaction effect between validity (valid: alcohol-related, invalid: neutral) and drink condition. Participants receiving a moderate dose of alcohol (0.40 g/kg) were faster to respond to alcohol-related stimuli compared with participants receiving a low dose of alcohol or placebo. These data indicate that the cognitive processes assayed by the visual probe and Stroop tasks may not be mediated by a common underlying mechanism. SN - 1461-7285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21708838/Effects_of_acute_alcohol_consumption_on_alcohol_related_cognitive_biases_in_light_and_heavy_drinkers_are_task_dependent_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269881111405355?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -