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Effects of two Lactobacillus strains on lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The hypocholesterolemic effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have now become an area of great interest and controversy for many scientists. In this study, we evaluated the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A and Lactobacillus fermentum M1-16 on body weight, lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet.

METHODS

Forty rats were assigned to four groups and fed either a normal or a high-cholesterol diet. The LAB-treated groups received the high-cholesterol diet supplemented with Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A or Lactobacillus fermentum M1-16. The rats were sacrificed after a 6-week feeding period. Body weights, visceral organ and fat pad weights, serum and liver cholesterol and lipid levels, and fecal cholesterol and bile acid concentrations were measured. Liver lipid deposition and adipocyte size were evaluated histologically.

RESULTS

Compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet but without LAB supplementation, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels were significantly decreased in LAB-treated rats (p < 0.05), with no significant change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels and liver lipid deposition were significantly decreased in the LAB-treated groups (p < 0.05). Accordingly, both fecal cholesterol and bile acids levels were significantly increased after LAB administration (p < 0.05). Intestinal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium colonies were increased while Escherichia coli colonies were decreased in the LAB-treated groups. Fecal water content was higher in the LAB-treated groups. Compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet, administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A resulted in decreases in the body weight gain, liver and fat pad weight, and adipocytes size (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that LAB supplementation has hypocholesterolemic effects in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The ability to lower serum cholesterol varies among LAB strains. Our strains might be able to improve the intestinal microbial balance and potentially improve intestinal transit time. Although the mechanism is largely unknown, L. plantarum 9-41-A may play a role in fat metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Xiangya Second Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410011, Hunan Province, PR China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21722398

Citation

Xie, Ning, et al. "Effects of Two Lactobacillus Strains On Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Microflora in Rats Fed a High-cholesterol Diet." BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 11, 2011, p. 53.
Xie N, Cui Y, Yin YN, et al. Effects of two Lactobacillus strains on lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011;11:53.
Xie, N., Cui, Y., Yin, Y. N., Zhao, X., Yang, J. W., Wang, Z. G., ... Lu, F. G. (2011). Effects of two Lactobacillus strains on lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 11, p. 53. doi:10.1186/1472-6882-11-53.
Xie N, et al. Effects of Two Lactobacillus Strains On Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Microflora in Rats Fed a High-cholesterol Diet. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011 Jul 3;11:53. PubMed PMID: 21722398.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of two Lactobacillus strains on lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. AU - Xie,Ning, AU - Cui,Yi, AU - Yin,Ya-Ni, AU - Zhao,Xin, AU - Yang,Jun-Wen, AU - Wang,Zheng-Gen, AU - Fu,Nian, AU - Tang,Yong, AU - Wang,Xue-Hong, AU - Liu,Xiao-Wei, AU - Wang,Chun-Lian, AU - Lu,Fang-Gen, Y1 - 2011/07/03/ PY - 2011/03/06/received PY - 2011/07/03/accepted PY - 2011/7/5/entrez PY - 2011/7/5/pubmed PY - 2012/1/14/medline SP - 53 EP - 53 JF - BMC complementary and alternative medicine JO - BMC Complement Altern Med VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The hypocholesterolemic effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have now become an area of great interest and controversy for many scientists. In this study, we evaluated the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A and Lactobacillus fermentum M1-16 on body weight, lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. METHODS: Forty rats were assigned to four groups and fed either a normal or a high-cholesterol diet. The LAB-treated groups received the high-cholesterol diet supplemented with Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A or Lactobacillus fermentum M1-16. The rats were sacrificed after a 6-week feeding period. Body weights, visceral organ and fat pad weights, serum and liver cholesterol and lipid levels, and fecal cholesterol and bile acid concentrations were measured. Liver lipid deposition and adipocyte size were evaluated histologically. RESULTS: Compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet but without LAB supplementation, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels were significantly decreased in LAB-treated rats (p < 0.05), with no significant change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels and liver lipid deposition were significantly decreased in the LAB-treated groups (p < 0.05). Accordingly, both fecal cholesterol and bile acids levels were significantly increased after LAB administration (p < 0.05). Intestinal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium colonies were increased while Escherichia coli colonies were decreased in the LAB-treated groups. Fecal water content was higher in the LAB-treated groups. Compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet, administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A resulted in decreases in the body weight gain, liver and fat pad weight, and adipocytes size (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that LAB supplementation has hypocholesterolemic effects in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The ability to lower serum cholesterol varies among LAB strains. Our strains might be able to improve the intestinal microbial balance and potentially improve intestinal transit time. Although the mechanism is largely unknown, L. plantarum 9-41-A may play a role in fat metabolism. SN - 1472-6882 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21722398/Effects_of_two_Lactobacillus_strains_on_lipid_metabolism_and_intestinal_microflora_in_rats_fed_a_high_cholesterol_diet_ L2 - https://bmccomplementalternmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6882-11-53 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -