Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Glycemic index and glycemic load used in combination to characterize metabolic responses of mixed meals in healthy lean young adults.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) have been independently assessed with regard to their metabolic effects and their associations with disease risk. Because a low-GI high-carbohydrate and a high-GI low-carbohydrate food/meal can produce the same GL, we propose that these 2 concepts should be used in conjunction to characterize the carbohydrate quality of mixed meals.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to measure postprandial glucose, insulin, and cortisol responses of meals differing in both GI and GL over a period of 3 hours (every 15 minutes for the first hour, and every 30 minutes subsequently), and to investigate the validity of methods of calculating GI and GL by measuring the cumulative incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for glucose and insulin (0-2 hours and 2-3 hours postprandially).

METHODS

A total of 10 healthy lean young adults (5 males, 5 females) participated. Breakfast meals were designed to differ in terms of GI and GL based on a 2 × 2 grid with a single elaboration: low-GI high-GL (M1); high-GI high-GL (M2a) of similar GL to M1; high-GI high-GL (M2b) of similar macronutrient composition to M1 (the elaboration); low-GI low-GL (M3); and high-GI low-GL (M4). The 5 breakfast meals were administered in a double-blind randomized crossover design. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to investigate differences in metabolic response between low- versus high-GI and between low- versus high-GL breakfast meals (and GI × GL interactions), with GI and GL used as within-subject factors.

RESULTS

High-GL meals increased glucose iAUC and insulin iAUC in both immediate (0-2 hours) (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, respectively) and middle postabsorptive periods (2-3 hours) (p = 0.04, p = 0.02, respectively) compared with low-GL meals. GI meals were not associated with glucose iAUC 0 to 2 hours (p = 0.37) and 2 to 3 hours (p = 0.81) postprandially. GI meals were not associated with insulin iAUC 0 to 2 hours postprandially (p = 0.81); in contrast, high-GI meals increased insulin iAUC 2 to 3 hours postprandially (p = 0.03) compared with low-GI meals. No significant differences were noted in cortisol responses, GI × GL interactions, or effect modification by gender.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings highlight the need for further investigation of meals/diets differing in both GI and GL to characterize metabolic responses and potential health effects.

Links

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Nutritional Sciences Research Division, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. rmicha@hsph.harvard.edu

Source

MeSH

Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Area Under Curve
Blood Glucose
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates
Female
Food Analysis
Glycemic Index
Humans
Hydrocortisone
Insulin
Interviews as Topic
Male
Micronutrients
Postprandial Period
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21730219

Citation

Micha, Renata, and Michael Nelson. "Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Used in Combination to Characterize Metabolic Responses of Mixed Meals in Healthy Lean Young Adults." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 30, no. 2, 2011, pp. 113-25.
Micha R, Nelson M. Glycemic index and glycemic load used in combination to characterize metabolic responses of mixed meals in healthy lean young adults. J Am Coll Nutr. 2011;30(2):113-25.
Micha, R., & Nelson, M. (2011). Glycemic index and glycemic load used in combination to characterize metabolic responses of mixed meals in healthy lean young adults. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 30(2), pp. 113-25.
Micha R, Nelson M. Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Used in Combination to Characterize Metabolic Responses of Mixed Meals in Healthy Lean Young Adults. J Am Coll Nutr. 2011;30(2):113-25. PubMed PMID: 21730219.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glycemic index and glycemic load used in combination to characterize metabolic responses of mixed meals in healthy lean young adults. AU - Micha,Renata, AU - Nelson,Michael, PY - 2011/7/7/entrez PY - 2011/7/7/pubmed PY - 2011/11/1/medline SP - 113 EP - 25 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) have been independently assessed with regard to their metabolic effects and their associations with disease risk. Because a low-GI high-carbohydrate and a high-GI low-carbohydrate food/meal can produce the same GL, we propose that these 2 concepts should be used in conjunction to characterize the carbohydrate quality of mixed meals. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to measure postprandial glucose, insulin, and cortisol responses of meals differing in both GI and GL over a period of 3 hours (every 15 minutes for the first hour, and every 30 minutes subsequently), and to investigate the validity of methods of calculating GI and GL by measuring the cumulative incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for glucose and insulin (0-2 hours and 2-3 hours postprandially). METHODS: A total of 10 healthy lean young adults (5 males, 5 females) participated. Breakfast meals were designed to differ in terms of GI and GL based on a 2 × 2 grid with a single elaboration: low-GI high-GL (M1); high-GI high-GL (M2a) of similar GL to M1; high-GI high-GL (M2b) of similar macronutrient composition to M1 (the elaboration); low-GI low-GL (M3); and high-GI low-GL (M4). The 5 breakfast meals were administered in a double-blind randomized crossover design. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to investigate differences in metabolic response between low- versus high-GI and between low- versus high-GL breakfast meals (and GI × GL interactions), with GI and GL used as within-subject factors. RESULTS: High-GL meals increased glucose iAUC and insulin iAUC in both immediate (0-2 hours) (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, respectively) and middle postabsorptive periods (2-3 hours) (p = 0.04, p = 0.02, respectively) compared with low-GL meals. GI meals were not associated with glucose iAUC 0 to 2 hours (p = 0.37) and 2 to 3 hours (p = 0.81) postprandially. GI meals were not associated with insulin iAUC 0 to 2 hours postprandially (p = 0.81); in contrast, high-GI meals increased insulin iAUC 2 to 3 hours postprandially (p = 0.03) compared with low-GI meals. No significant differences were noted in cortisol responses, GI × GL interactions, or effect modification by gender. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the need for further investigation of meals/diets differing in both GI and GL to characterize metabolic responses and potential health effects. SN - 1541-1087 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21730219/Glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_used_in_combination_to_characterize_metabolic_responses_of_mixed_meals_in_healthy_lean_young_adults_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/carbohydrates.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -