Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Reported zinc, but not copper, intakes influence whole-body bone density, mineral content and T score responses to zinc and copper supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women.
Br J Nutr 2011; 106(12):1872-9BJ

Abstract

A supplementation trial starting with 224 postmenopausal women provided with adequate vitamin D and Ca was conducted to determine whether increased Cu and Zn intakes would reduce the risk for bone loss. Healthy women aged 51-80 years were recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Women with similar femoral neck T scores and BMI were randomly assigned to two groups of 112 each that were supplemented daily for 2 years with 600 mg Ca plus maize starch placebo or 600 mg Ca plus 2 mg Cu and 12 mg Zn. Whole-body bone mineral contents, densities and T scores were determined biannually by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and 5 d food diaries were obtained annually. Repeated-measures ANCOVA showed that bone mineral contents, densities and T scores decreased from baseline values to year 2. A priori contrasts between baseline and year 2 indicated that the greatest decreases occurred with Cu and Zn supplementation. Based on 5 d food diaries, the negative effect was caused by Zn and mainly occurred with Zn intakes ≥ 8·0 mg/d. With Zn intakes < 8·0 mg/d, Zn supplementation apparently prevented a significant decrease in whole-body bone densities and T scores. Food diaries also indicated that Mg intakes < 237 mg/d, Cu intakes < 0·9 mg/d and Zn intakes < 8·0 mg/d are associated with poorer bone health. The findings indicate that Zn supplementation may be beneficial to bone health in postmenopausal women with usual Zn intakes < 8·0 mg/d but not in women consuming adequate amounts of Zn.

Authors+Show Affiliations

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA, ARS), Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, ND, USA. forrest.nielsen@ars.usda.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21733304

Citation

Nielsen, Forrest H., et al. "Reported Zinc, but Not Copper, Intakes Influence Whole-body Bone Density, Mineral Content and T Score Responses to Zinc and Copper Supplementation in Healthy Postmenopausal Women." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 106, no. 12, 2011, pp. 1872-9.
Nielsen FH, Lukaski HC, Johnson LK, et al. Reported zinc, but not copper, intakes influence whole-body bone density, mineral content and T score responses to zinc and copper supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women. Br J Nutr. 2011;106(12):1872-9.
Nielsen, F. H., Lukaski, H. C., Johnson, L. K., & Roughead, Z. K. (2011). Reported zinc, but not copper, intakes influence whole-body bone density, mineral content and T score responses to zinc and copper supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women. The British Journal of Nutrition, 106(12), pp. 1872-9. doi:10.1017/S0007114511002352.
Nielsen FH, et al. Reported Zinc, but Not Copper, Intakes Influence Whole-body Bone Density, Mineral Content and T Score Responses to Zinc and Copper Supplementation in Healthy Postmenopausal Women. Br J Nutr. 2011;106(12):1872-9. PubMed PMID: 21733304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reported zinc, but not copper, intakes influence whole-body bone density, mineral content and T score responses to zinc and copper supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women. AU - Nielsen,Forrest H, AU - Lukaski,Henry C, AU - Johnson,LuAnn K, AU - Roughead,Z K Fariba, Y1 - 2011/07/01/ PY - 2011/7/8/entrez PY - 2011/7/8/pubmed PY - 2012/1/21/medline SP - 1872 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 106 IS - 12 N2 - A supplementation trial starting with 224 postmenopausal women provided with adequate vitamin D and Ca was conducted to determine whether increased Cu and Zn intakes would reduce the risk for bone loss. Healthy women aged 51-80 years were recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Women with similar femoral neck T scores and BMI were randomly assigned to two groups of 112 each that were supplemented daily for 2 years with 600 mg Ca plus maize starch placebo or 600 mg Ca plus 2 mg Cu and 12 mg Zn. Whole-body bone mineral contents, densities and T scores were determined biannually by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and 5 d food diaries were obtained annually. Repeated-measures ANCOVA showed that bone mineral contents, densities and T scores decreased from baseline values to year 2. A priori contrasts between baseline and year 2 indicated that the greatest decreases occurred with Cu and Zn supplementation. Based on 5 d food diaries, the negative effect was caused by Zn and mainly occurred with Zn intakes ≥ 8·0 mg/d. With Zn intakes < 8·0 mg/d, Zn supplementation apparently prevented a significant decrease in whole-body bone densities and T scores. Food diaries also indicated that Mg intakes < 237 mg/d, Cu intakes < 0·9 mg/d and Zn intakes < 8·0 mg/d are associated with poorer bone health. The findings indicate that Zn supplementation may be beneficial to bone health in postmenopausal women with usual Zn intakes < 8·0 mg/d but not in women consuming adequate amounts of Zn. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21733304/Reported_zinc_but_not_copper_intakes_influence_whole_body_bone_density_mineral_content_and_T_score_responses_to_zinc_and_copper_supplementation_in_healthy_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114511002352/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -