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Body mass index and risk of non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.
Eur J Cancer 2011; 47(16):2422-30EJ

Abstract

We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarise the epidemiologic evidence regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) incidence and NHL mortality. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed (1966-May 2011) and the reference lists of retrieved articles. For each study, we estimated a relative risk (RR) for a 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI. A random-effects model was used to combine the RR estimates from individual studies. The summary RRs for a 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI were 1.07 (95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.04-1.10) for NHL incidence (16 studies, n=17,291 cases) and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) for NHL mortality (five studies, n=3407 cases). BMI was significantly positively associated with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26), but not other NHL subtypes. The difference in risk estimates for subtypes was not statistically significant (P=0.10). There was evidence of a nonlinear association between BMI and HL (P for nonlinearity=0.01) (five studies, n=1557 cases). The summary RRs of HL were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.85-1.12) for overweight and 1.41 (95% CI, 1.14-1.75) for obesity. These results indicate that BMI is positively associated with risk of NHL and HL as well as with NHL mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.seNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21733676

Citation

Larsson, Susanna C., and Alicja Wolk. "Body Mass Index and Risk of non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's Lymphoma: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies." European Journal of Cancer (Oxford, England : 1990), vol. 47, no. 16, 2011, pp. 2422-30.
Larsson SC, Wolk A. Body mass index and risk of non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Eur J Cancer. 2011;47(16):2422-30.
Larsson, S. C., & Wolk, A. (2011). Body mass index and risk of non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. European Journal of Cancer (Oxford, England : 1990), 47(16), pp. 2422-30. doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2011.06.029.
Larsson SC, Wolk A. Body Mass Index and Risk of non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's Lymphoma: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. Eur J Cancer. 2011;47(16):2422-30. PubMed PMID: 21733676.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and risk of non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Wolk,Alicja, Y1 - 2011/07/04/ PY - 2011/03/30/received PY - 2011/06/02/revised PY - 2011/06/08/accepted PY - 2011/7/8/entrez PY - 2011/7/8/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 2422 EP - 30 JF - European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) JO - Eur. J. Cancer VL - 47 IS - 16 N2 - We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarise the epidemiologic evidence regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) incidence and NHL mortality. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed (1966-May 2011) and the reference lists of retrieved articles. For each study, we estimated a relative risk (RR) for a 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI. A random-effects model was used to combine the RR estimates from individual studies. The summary RRs for a 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI were 1.07 (95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.04-1.10) for NHL incidence (16 studies, n=17,291 cases) and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) for NHL mortality (five studies, n=3407 cases). BMI was significantly positively associated with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26), but not other NHL subtypes. The difference in risk estimates for subtypes was not statistically significant (P=0.10). There was evidence of a nonlinear association between BMI and HL (P for nonlinearity=0.01) (five studies, n=1557 cases). The summary RRs of HL were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.85-1.12) for overweight and 1.41 (95% CI, 1.14-1.75) for obesity. These results indicate that BMI is positively associated with risk of NHL and HL as well as with NHL mortality. SN - 1879-0852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21733676/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0959-8049(11)00433-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -